popular

Babes Wodumo Has Responded to Her Appearing in the Music Video Referencing Her Alleged Abuse

"Mind your own business" says the gqom artist.

The Babes Wodumo-Mampintsha saga continues to leave many South Africans bewildered. After Babes appeared in the "Khona Ingane Lay'ndlini" music video with Mampintsha and DJ Tira which dropped last week Friday, many have been left scratching their heads.

Although she initially remained quiet about the music video, Babes finally responded to a follower on social media and basically told them to mind their own business.


South Africans are currently divided in terms of their feelings towards Babes Wodumo. Some are angry and have completely written her off along with her alleged abuser Mampintsha. Some are still sitting on the fence while others remain sympathetic of her situation.

READ: Here's the Latest on South African Artist Babes Wodumo's Assault Case

One of Babes' Twitter followers expressed her concern at how other abused South African women would be treated in future in light of the artist's confusing actions. In what appears to now have been deleted, she tweeted the following:

"In a country and world with such a high rate of gender-based violence, you are using your platform as a disservice to all the young women and elder victims of abuse. As a public figure, you have the responsibility as a role model. You are doing no justice to the calls you sent out earlier this year - calls many responded to and were triggered by. What you have done is confusing and mocks many people who supported you as a survivor of abuse."

South Africa's femicide rate and gender-based violence is alarming and women still face tremendous hurdles in terms of obtaining justice.

However, according to SowetanLIVE, Babes evidently did not appreciate the remark and responded in isiZulu saying, "Ey sis naka izindaba zakho... uphume ezindabeni zabant ababili..." which roughly translates to "sis, mind your own business and stay out of matters that concern two people."

As some South Africans have pointed out in the past, abuse is a cycle and abused women find themselves returning to their abusers time and again. What may seem irrational to those peering in from the outside, is not necessarily the same way the individual being abused may see it.

The controversial track caused a social media storm when it reached the number one spot on iTunes a few days ago.

One Twitter user, made the following unnerving statement:




Listen to 10 Great Songs From Johnny Clegg

Here are some of the best songs to remember South Africa's son of the soil.

Yesterday, it was confirmed that South African musician, Johnny Clegg, passed away after a long battle with cancer.

Understandably, heartfelt tributes have been pouring in ever since. Long before it was cool (or even legal) to be in close proximity to blackness and anything attached to it in South Africa, Clegg, a white man, was doing just that. That is exactly why he was given the endearing title of South Africa's "son of the soil."

Growing up during Apartheid, Clegg was taught how to speak the Zulu language by a domestic worker named Charlie Mzila. In his teenage years, his appreciation for the Zulu culture continued and he soon learnt the traditional dance styles known as isishameni and also learnt how to play the Maskandi guitar. Clegg's music was a beacon of light during a very dark time in South Africa's history and his songs about Nelson Mandela (at a time where songs were banned for merely mentioning the name of the late statesman and other key struggle activists) brought the country together.

It is irrefutable that a music giant has fallen. However, Clegg leaves behind a wealth of music featuring other great South African artists and groups such as Zakwe, Brenda Fassie, Miriam Makeba, Hugh Masekela and Juluka/Suvuka, among several others. His music undeniably brought South Africans and people all around the world together.

We've picked ten of our favorite songs from the late musician's discography in honor of a life that was lived to the fullest.

Keep reading... Show less
Stonebwoy in "Tuff Seed"

The 12 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Stonebwoy, Mahmoud Ahmed, Tiwa Savage x Zlatan, Africa Express, Juls x Mr Eazi and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our Best Music of the Week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's new playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Keep reading... Show less

Beyoncé Wore These 2 African Designers in Her Music Video for 'Spirit'

Queen Bey continues to include and give a nod to African talent in her visuals.

As we draw even closer to Disney's The Lion King opening in theaters this week, Beyoncé continues to lead the way with her new music video for "Spirit"—the first single off of the film's album she produced and curated, The Lion King: The Gift.

Shot in the Havasu Falls in Arizona's Grand Canyon, Beyoncé and her legion of beautiful dancers are one with nature and its various elements as she beckons us to be brave and hear the calling of spirit. As we noted when she announced the album, the track opens with a call and response in Swahili that translates to "Long live the king": Uishi kwa mda mrefu mfalme—uishi kwa.

Keeping our eyes peeled for African influences in the music video, it's evident that is seen in the choreography. We even spotted our extended fam with the afrobeats moves—the AVO Boys: Stephen Ojo and Caleb Bonney—as two of her dancers in the video.

Beyoncé continues to also give a nod to African talent through the looks she donned in "Spirit" styled by her mainstay, Zerina Akers.

Take a look at the two African designers she wore in the video below.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.