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Babes Wodumo Has Responded to Her Appearing in the Music Video Referencing Her Alleged Abuse

"Mind your own business" says the gqom artist.

The Babes Wodumo-Mampintsha saga continues to leave many South Africans bewildered. After Babes appeared in the "Khona Ingane Lay'ndlini" music video with Mampintsha and DJ Tira which dropped last week Friday, many have been left scratching their heads.

Although she initially remained quiet about the music video, Babes finally responded to a follower on social media and basically told them to mind their own business.


South Africans are currently divided in terms of their feelings towards Babes Wodumo. Some are angry and have completely written her off along with her alleged abuser Mampintsha. Some are still sitting on the fence while others remain sympathetic of her situation.

READ: Here's the Latest on South African Artist Babes Wodumo's Assault Case

One of Babes' Twitter followers expressed her concern at how other abused South African women would be treated in future in light of the artist's confusing actions. In what appears to now have been deleted, she tweeted the following:

"In a country and world with such a high rate of gender-based violence, you are using your platform as a disservice to all the young women and elder victims of abuse. As a public figure, you have the responsibility as a role model. You are doing no justice to the calls you sent out earlier this year - calls many responded to and were triggered by. What you have done is confusing and mocks many people who supported you as a survivor of abuse."

South Africa's femicide rate and gender-based violence is alarming and women still face tremendous hurdles in terms of obtaining justice.

However, according to SowetanLIVE, Babes evidently did not appreciate the remark and responded in isiZulu saying, "Ey sis naka izindaba zakho... uphume ezindabeni zabant ababili..." which roughly translates to "sis, mind your own business and stay out of matters that concern two people."

As some South Africans have pointed out in the past, abuse is a cycle and abused women find themselves returning to their abusers time and again. What may seem irrational to those peering in from the outside, is not necessarily the same way the individual being abused may see it.

The controversial track caused a social media storm when it reached the number one spot on iTunes a few days ago.

One Twitter user, made the following unnerving statement:




(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

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Photo: Leon Neal/Getty Images

How You Can Help Nigeria’s #EndSARS Protests

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Widespread protests against Nigeria's notorious Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS) are becoming more of a revolution. The movement is an outcry from youths demanding a general reform of the country, majorly characterized by poor governance, with a focus on the harassment and assaults committed by SARS. The movement has been raging through the city of Lagos for the past three weeks, as protesters home and abroad have taken to the streets in masses to express their keen dissatisfaction.

Hashtags like #EndSARS, #EndPoliceBrutality, and #EndBadGovernanceInNigeria have brandished across all social media platforms to amplify the voices of the youth people fighting back. These hashtags have, in turn, gained traction with the help of celebrities like singers Rihanna, Demi Lovato, and Beyoncé, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, and many others. Nigerian stars, Falz, Runtown, Tiwa Savage, Davido, Wizkid, Burna Boy, and many more also joined in the movement, as many of them took to the streets with placards.

To date, the peacefully protesting Nigerians' needs have not been met. With said needs not being satisfied as they demand justice for lives lost due to the brutal and corrupt practices of police officers.

We have rounded up some ways you can support this movement and its cause, no matter where you are in the world.

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The 8 Songs You Need to Hear This Week

Featuring Simmy, Made Kuti, Shane Eagle, Emel Mathlouthi, Amaarae and more.

Every week, we highlight the cream of the crop in music through our best music of the week column.

Here's our round up of the best tracks and music videos that came across our desks, which you can also check out in our Songs You Need to Hear This Week playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

Follow our SONGS YOU NEED TO HEAR THIS WEEK playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Check out all of OkayAfrica's playlists on Spotify and Apple Music.

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