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Babes Wodumo Has Responded to Her Appearing in the Music Video Referencing Her Alleged Abuse

"Mind your own business" says the gqom artist.

The Babes Wodumo-Mampintsha saga continues to leave many South Africans bewildered. After Babes appeared in the "Khona Ingane Lay'ndlini" music video with Mampintsha and DJ Tira which dropped last week Friday, many have been left scratching their heads.

Although she initially remained quiet about the music video, Babes finally responded to a follower on social media and basically told them to mind their own business.


South Africans are currently divided in terms of their feelings towards Babes Wodumo. Some are angry and have completely written her off along with her alleged abuser Mampintsha. Some are still sitting on the fence while others remain sympathetic of her situation.

READ: Here's the Latest on South African Artist Babes Wodumo's Assault Case

One of Babes' Twitter followers expressed her concern at how other abused South African women would be treated in future in light of the artist's confusing actions. In what appears to now have been deleted, she tweeted the following:

"In a country and world with such a high rate of gender-based violence, you are using your platform as a disservice to all the young women and elder victims of abuse. As a public figure, you have the responsibility as a role model. You are doing no justice to the calls you sent out earlier this year - calls many responded to and were triggered by. What you have done is confusing and mocks many people who supported you as a survivor of abuse."

South Africa's femicide rate and gender-based violence is alarming and women still face tremendous hurdles in terms of obtaining justice.

However, according to SowetanLIVE, Babes evidently did not appreciate the remark and responded in isiZulu saying, "Ey sis naka izindaba zakho... uphume ezindabeni zabant ababili..." which roughly translates to "sis, mind your own business and stay out of matters that concern two people."

As some South Africans have pointed out in the past, abuse is a cycle and abused women find themselves returning to their abusers time and again. What may seem irrational to those peering in from the outside, is not necessarily the same way the individual being abused may see it.

The controversial track caused a social media storm when it reached the number one spot on iTunes a few days ago.

One Twitter user, made the following unnerving statement:




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