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Beyonce performs during the Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100 at FNB Stadium on December 2, 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Raven Varona/Parkwood/PictureGroup).

Beyoncé Brought the House Down at Global Citizen Festival As Her Stunning Outfits Took Center Stage

Queen Bey did not disappoint rocking outfits connecting to the continent while performing at 'Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100.' Here are our favorite looks.

All eyes were on the Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100 on Sunday at FNB Stadium in Johannesburg.

Presented by the Motsepe Foundation and in partnership with House of Mandela, Cassper Nyovest, D'Banj, Ed Sheeran, Eddie Vedder, Femi Kuti, Kacey Musgraves, Pharrell Williams, Chris Martin, Sho Madjozi, Tiwa Savage, Usher and Wizkid vibed with an stadium full of participants who took action, responding to Nelson Mandela's call to be the generation to end extreme poverty.

Those in attendance and those who were watching via the festival's various livestream feeds anticipated none other than Beyoncé and JAY-Z to close out the show with a bang—and they did so in style.


Beyoncé was styled by none other than Zerina Akers, who did her due diligence to source her looks locally and made sure that each outfit had a connection to the continent—like her opening ensemble designed by Mary Katrantzou. According to Beyoncé's mother Tina Lawson, her coat, full of intricate beading a sequins, have all 54 African countries mapped out on it. More details from the designer here.

Beyonce and Jay-Z perform during the Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100 at FNB Stadium on December 2, 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Raven Varona/Parkwood/PictureGroup)

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Akers also decked Queen Bey out in an ancient-Egyptian inspired beaded bodysuit adorned with hieroglyphs and another ensemble full of colorful beads designed similarly to traditional Zulu jewelry—both by BALMAIN.


What took many folks' breath away during the performance was her Zulu rendition of "Halo" with the Soweto Choir. Multimedia visual artist Trevor Stuurman, a panelist on OkayAfrica and Global Citizen's The Next 100 Summit, captured the moment as a photographer on Beyoncé's team for the festival.

Beyonce performs with the Soweto Choir during the Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100 at FNB Stadium on December 2, 2018 in Johannesburg, South Africa. (Photo by Trevor Stuurman/Parkwood/PictureGroup)

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Ms. Carter dons an emerald green outfit made in collaboration by South African designers Enhle Mbali Maphumulo of Manual Rossa Apparel and Quiteria & George.

ICYMI, catch the bit of her closing set that was livestreamed with JAY-Z below.

GLOBAL CITIZEN FESTIVAL, FNB STADIUM: 02 DEC 2018 youtu.be

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Images courtesy of Wikimedia Commons and Sabelo Mkhabela.

Wizkid, Anatii Win Big at BET Soul Train Awards Alongside Beyoncé

The Nigerian and South African artists, respectively, won soul train awards for their contributions to 'Brown Skin Girl."

Nigeria's Wizkid and South Africa's Anatii both earned BET Soul Train Awards last night for their contributions to Beyoncé's hit song "Brown Skin Girl."

The song, which is an ode to dark-skinned women, was one of the standout tracks from Beyoncé's The Lion King: The Gift. It earned the "Ashford and Simpson Songwriter's Award" last night during the awards ceremony in Las Vegas. Wizkid is featured on the track and has a writing credit, while Anatii is credited as a composer along with Michael Uzowuru, and others.

Related: Listen to New Wizkid Songs From His Surprise 2019 EP 'Soundman Vol. 1'

The song was also nominated in the "Best Collaboration Performance" category.

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Image courtesy of Sarkodie.

Interview: Sarkodie Is Going Global By Staying True to Ghana

In a new interview with the star rapper, we talk about his upcoming album "Black Love," his monumental BET award win, plans for the Year of Return and the 'afrobeats invasion.'

For many, Sarkodie is Africa's best MC, and he's got the flow to back that up. For about a decade now, the artist has remained consistent in dropping jams that aren't only memorable (and often fun to party to), but ones that also stay unapologetically true to his Ghanaian heritage.

With his upcoming project, Black Love (which is slated for a surprise release) he continues on that path, but with a special focus on love and relationships. "Can't Let You Go," the first single, which he released over a year ago, also doubled as a wedding video. Since then, he's dropped a string of singles that also capture the theme at the heart of the project. The most recent being "Party & Bullshit" featuring Idris Elba and Donae'O—a collaboration between the Ghanaian artists that celebrates the love felt amongst friends when simply having a good time.

The artist's status as a formidable MC was further solidified last month when he became the first artist to win BET's Best International Flow Award and delivered a freestyle mostly in Twi that represented his heritage and spoke to the importance of black pride. The international recognition was welcomed, but it merely reemphasized what most of those paying attention to his career already knew. It was unsurprising that he'd win an award for his flow— his fans have been raving about his for years. "They created [this category] for him," remarked one Twitter user.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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