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Calling All Nollywood Classics!

Considering how Nollywood has transformed over the past two decades and the implications for present-day Nigerian film industry.


(Pieter Hugo's Nollywood series 2009)

This December is the month of African film! Okay- not really. But it should be! Every couple of weeks there's a new analysis demonstrating how much of an impact the African film industry is making around the world, and more specifically, how Nollywood is taking over the film industry.

Some of us around here are huge Nollywood fans, but others (like myself) just aren't about that life. I have family, friends and co-workers that swear by how entertaining Nollywood is, but as Richard Linklater's Before Sunset is one of my favorite films- maybe you can see why Nollywood and I just don't mesh. A confession? I have never, ever watched an entire Nollywood film- when I was growing up whenever they were on the screen, I either tuned out the sound or left the room. The overacting, poor writing, and overindulgent drama were simply not appealing to me. But here we are, and Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan is making claims that Nollywood is Nigeria's greatest ambassador?

I will admit that now, I'm kind of curious- my grandmother watches Nollywood films all day, and I mean ALL DAY on Africa Magic (DSTV Channel) in Lagos, completely enraptured in the excessively dramatic plot twists, reincarnations, deceit, etc. There has to be something I'm missing right?

Nollywood has gotten quite the reputation for producing poorly developed and ludicrous films that are not to be viewed in a theatre- but from the comfort of one's couch. However, maybe it's worth giving Nollywood credit as more directors/producers are creating films with better writing and acting. Doctor Bello, which recently premiered in NY at the ADIFF festival features African-American actor Isaiah Washington and aims to make Nollywood films more accessible to a larger global market.

With that, here at Okayafrica we figured it's also worth honoring old Nollywood...the classics. We're asking you guys to comment on the post and give us your top 5 Nollywood Classics. Once we have enough votes- I figure I'll spend a day like my grandmother, and see what Nollywood is all about by watching the movies back to back ALL DAY, while live tweeting @okayafrica. So top five Nollywood Classics- GO!

News Brief
Photo: Getty

Here's What You Need To Know About The Political Unrest In Sudan

Thousands have been protesting the Sudanese government over the weekend, supporting the military's plans for a coup.

Sudan's transitional government is in turmoil as thousands of citizens conducted a sit-in protest against them, over the weekend. A group of Sudanese citizens have called on the military to disestablish the nation's current government, as the country struggles with the greatest crisis they've seen since the end of former dictator Omar al-Bashir's controversial ruling, two years ago. The weekend's pro-military protests come as anti-military protestors took to the streets earlier this month to fight for civilian-ruled laws.

Military-aligned demonstrators assembled outside of the famously off-limits entrance of the Presidential Palace located in the Sudanese capital, Khartoum on Monday. Gatherers set up tents, blocking off access to two main intersections, cutting off access to the capital for those inside. Police attempted to wave off crowds with teargas, with Khartoum state officials saying they had, "repelled an attempted assault on the seat of government," in a statement issued Monday.

The assembly was called for by a coalition of rebel groups and political parties that support Sudan's military, accusing the civilian political parties of mismanagement and monopolizing power under their ruling. Demonstrations began on Saturday, but Sunday's gathering saw a lower attendance. According to Reuters, by Monday afternoon, thousands, between 2,000 - 3,000, had returned to voice their concerns. 52-year-old tribal elder Tahar Fadl al-Mawla spoke at the helm of the sit-in outside of the Presidential palace saying, "The civilian government has failed. We want a government of soldiers to protect the transition." Alongside a 65-year-old Ahman Jumaa who claimed to have traveled more than 900 kilometers (570 miles) from Southern region Nyala to show his support.

Protesters are demanding the appointment of a new cabinet that is "more representative of the people who participated in the December 2019 revolution that eventually led to the ousting of former president Omar al-Bashir", Al Jazeera reported from Sudan. Protesters headed towards the Presidential Palace, where an emergency cabinet meeting was being held when they were met by police forces.

Pro-civilian political parties have plans for their own demonstration on Thursday, the anniversary of the 1964 revolution that overthrew Sudan's first military regime under Ibrahim Abboud and brought in a period of democracy that the country still struggles to uphold.


Sudanese Twitter users shared their thoughts online, with many drawing similarities between the current unrest and other political crises the nation has faced.


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