popular

Casanova, Davido & Tory Lanez' '2AM' Will Soundtrack Your Weekend

Flatbush meets Lagos and Toronto in this addictive new single.

Brooklyn rapper Casanova rolls through with an energetic new collaboration with Davido and Tory Lanez.

"2AM" sees the rapper going in over highly-infectious afrobeats-meets-pop beat work, in the same vein as we've heard from massive hits like "Unforgettable." The song was produced by 30 Roc.

The single features the star power of Davido and Tory Lanez which gives "2AM" the increased potential to be one of those huge new jams that'll be getting constant spins this year on both sides of the Atlantic (it's already got the top slot in Spotify's African Heat playlist).

The music video kicks off in Atlanta but eventually follows Casanova to Lagos, where he connects with Davido in Shitta. The clip was directed by Nigeria's Meji Alabi, the creative force behind many of your favorite afrobeats videos.

"2AM" is the lead single from Casanova's upcoming EP, Free At Last, which is due from Roc Nation/Def Jam Recordings on February 15.

We talked to Casanova below to learn a little more about this new collaboration and sound for him.


Casanova - 2AM ft. Tory Lanez, Davido youtu.be

How did you first link up with Davido?

Davido invited me to a show a couple months ago. I saw him perform and then right after the show, it was crazy, he was like, 'let's go the studio.' And I wasn't so sure 'cause [my music's] more shoot 'em up bang bang and he's Davido, you know. It didn't work out that time. But then, I got this afrobeats style song with Tory Lanez on it, I did two verses and my producer was like: 'you need an African for this beat.' And I'm like, 'ohh I got Davido!' So I let him listen to the record on Facetime and he was like send that to me. When he sent me back his part, that to me was like, 'woww, ok we got a hit.'

This was your first time going to Nigeria, and your first time in Africa, how was your experience?

It was different man. Seeing the little kids, seeing the rich and poor parts. it made me appreciate life and stop complaining about the things that I got. It opened my eyes to different sounds. You know, being in the club you listen to different types of music, like Nigerian and UK stuff. Out here it's all trap, or New York or down South music in the club. But over there you're hearing different languages and different drums.

Tell me about the afrobeats influence on "2AM," what made you pick this sound?

I'm from Flatbush and my parents are Caribbean. So it was easy for me. Flatbush is where the Labor Day Parade is. I'm very familiar with reggae and Caribbean sounds. [This new sound] was a risk I took, and I'm glad I took it.

Are you listening to any other African artists right now?

[starts singing] Ye Ye, Ye Ye Ye Ye. Burna Boy. And I'm also into Wizkid.

How was working with director Meji Alabi and shooting in Shitta, Lagos.

It was dope. He had everything under control. The area was crazy man, I felt like I've been to the hardest places in New York but that was different. That right there, it cant compare to nothing I've seen. I felt comfortable shooting there, but I also knew it could get ugly at any moment.

What can people expect from the upcoming EP.

It's called Free at Last. Davido and Tory Lanez are my only features. I might explore different sounds on it—I might go salsa or pop, who knows, I gotta see how I sound on it. The project comes out Feb 15.


popular

Cardi B Teases New Remix of Davido's 'Fall'

Looks like the Nigerian star's massive hit is getting yet another re-up.

Cardi B has teased her apparent upcoming remix of Davido's "Fall."

Posting from a private jet, as she was on her way to New York before heading to West Africa, Cardi B shared a video of herself rapping and dancing along to the unreleased remix.

From the sounds of it, Cardi's "Fall" remix will feature a brand new verse from the New York rapper.

Keep reading... Show less
Music
Still from YouTube.

'Entertainment Has Saved Nigeria'—Here's What Happened When Davido Spoke at Columbia University

The artist discussed his new album 'A Good Time' and changing perceptions of Africa through music with Melanin Unscripted founder Amarachi Nwosu.

A week ago, media platform and digital agency Melanin Unscripted along with Columbia University's African Students Association hosted none other than Nigerian megastar Davido for a talk entitled "Shaping the Image of Africa Through Music, which focused on the themes in his newly released sophomore album A Good Time as well as "the next frontier of afrobeats."

There was a feeling of pride and excitement as attendees—mostly African students from Columbia, gathered at Columbia University's campus in NYC. The night's two hosts quizzed the audience on Davido trivia, and ran through other Afrobeats-related questions to keep the audience entertained as we awaited the artist's arrival.

Once Davido finally came through—about an hour and a half later—the excitement still hadn't waned. Moderator, Amarachi Nwosu, the founder of Melanin Unscripted, asked the artist a range of questions that touched on the role of social media in helping spread African pop music, using his platform and influence to address social issues in his country—"music has saved Nigeria," the artist remarked—as well as the making of A Good Time. "I just got tired of Americans singing 'If' and 'Fall," the artist joked.

In line with the night's theme, the event was an overall "good time," complete with a fun conversation between Davido and Nwosu that highlighted the artist's humorous side and energetic personality. You can check out the 45-minute conversation in full below courtesy of Melanin Unscripted.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.