News Brief

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's 'Americanah' Is the 'One Book' for New Yorkers to Read This Spring

'Americanah' was chosen as the novel for all of New York City to read this spring.

One Book, One New York is America's largest community reading program. It sets out to support small bookstores and promote civic engagement through a citywide reading of a selected novel.


For its first collective reading, New York has chosen Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's seminal work, Americanah. Other contenders included Ta-Nehisi Coates' Between the World and Me, Paul Beatty's The SelloutBetty Smith's A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, and Junot Diaz's The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. 

The entire city is being encouraged to read Americanah and to attend small book club meetings throughout the spring. The city of New York has also donated 1,000 copies of the novel to the New York Public Library to help boost participation.

In June, a final meet-up will take place at the main branch of the New York Public Library and Adichie is set to be in attendance, reports Business Insider.

Americanah—Adichie's enthralling tale of blackness and identity—is a must-read whether you're in the city or not.

popular
Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Lupita Nyong'o Will Star in the HBO Max Series Based on Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's 'Americanah'

Danai Gurira will executive produce the series.

Oscar winner Lupita Nyong'o is set to take on the lead role in the HBO Max series based on Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's novel, Americanah. The 10-episode series will be executive produced by Tony Award-winning actress, Danai Gurira.

Keep reading... Show less
News Brief
Photo by Ulf Andersen/Getty Images.

Cameroonian Author Imbolo Mbue's Next Novel Has Been Picked Up by Penguin Random House

The second novel from the mind behind "Behold the Dreamers" is set to tell another poignant, but relatable story on the African experience.

The second novel from Cameroon's own Imbolo Mbue is in the works, Brittle Paper reports.

How Beautiful We Were, the novel's current title, has been acquired by Penguin Random House for its North American rights. The publisher says the book is "a story told through multiple perspectives about what happens when an African village decides to fight back against an American oil company that is destroying their land."

Keep reading... Show less
popular

14 Cultural Events You Can't Miss this December in South Africa

OkayAfrica's guide to must-see events during South Africa's festive season.

South Africans will tell you that December is not just a month, it's an entire lifestyle. From beginning to end, it's about being immersed in a ton of activity with friends and family as well as any new folk you meet along the way. Whether you're looking to turn up to some good music or watch some provocative theater, our guide to just 14 cultural events happening in South Africa this December, has something for everyone.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.