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'Dandy Queens': A New Editorial Points A Lens At The Female Black Dandy

'Dandy Queens,' a new photo editorial from Blackattitude Magazine, points a lens at the female black dandy.

In recent months we've noted two bodies of work that shine a light on the worldwide rise of "black dandyism." First there was Ariel Wizman and Laurent Lunetta's 55-minute Black Dandy documentary, which aired on France's Canal+ in March. Next there came news of the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago's Dandy Lion: (Re)Articulating Black Masculine Identity. The series, which is on view through July, touts itself as the first comprehensive exhibition of its kind through its spotlight on young men across the Diaspora who are defying stereotypical and monolithic notions of “Black masculinity” with the way they dress.


Recently, a new editorial from French magazine Blackattitude turn its lens towards a trio of female dandies. Shot by Prisca M. Monnier as a collaboration with Nadeem Mateky, Dandy Queens sees its sartorial-clad models (Aurélie Lamalle, Marama Lee, Khady Diallo) take on the roles of Jo March (the lead character from Louisa May Alcott's Little Women, American abolitionist Dr. Mary Walker Chirurgienne (Mary Edwards Walker), and the frontierswoman Martha Jane Canary (Calamity Jane). Head to Blackattitude for the full editorial. For more, follow the magazine on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

H/T Dynamic Africa

Interview

Interview: Wavy The Creator Is Ready to See You Now

The multidisciplinary Nigerian-American artist on tapping into all her creative outlets, creating interesting things, releasing a new single and life during quarantine.

A trip canceled, plans interrupted, projects stalled. It is six months now since Wavy the Creator has had to make a stop at an undisclosed location to go into quarantine and get away from the eye of the pandemic.

The professional recording artist, photographer, writer, fashion artist, designer, and evolving creative has been spending all of this time in a house occupied by other creatives. This situation is ideal. At least for an artist like Wavy who is always in a rapid motion of creating and bringing interesting things to life. The energy around the house is robust enough to tap from and infuse into any of her numerous creative outlets. Sometimes, they also inspire trips into new creative territories. Most recently, for Wavy, are self-taught lessons on a bass guitar.

Wavy's days in this house are not without a pattern, of course. But some of the rituals and personal rules she drew up for herself, like many of us did for internal direction, at the beginning of the pandemic have been rewritten, adjusted, and sometimes ditched altogether. Some days start early and end late. Some find her at her sewing machine fixing up thrift clothes to fit her taste, a skill she picked up to earn extra cash while in college, others find her hard at work in the studio, writing or recording music.

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