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Photography by Haneem Christian and Thandi Gula.

Dope Saint Jude’s New Music Video Showcases Black Grrrl Magic

Watch Dope Saint Jude's latest music video for 'Grrrl Like.'

South African rapper Dope Saint Jude's latest music video will make you jump for joy. The music video for her latest song "Grrrl Like" showcases black women triumphing in their own terms. In the song, the MC rides a bass-heavy electronic instrumental with her customary verve and conviction.


The artist directed the music video, which is part of an upcoming project.

Read: Dope Saint Jude Has a Right To Flex

She had this to say about the video:

"The track makes a strong reference to the Riot Grrrl movement, which was an underground feminist punk movement that began in the early 1990s in the US. The Riot Grrrl movement resonates strongly with me, and with this project, I wanted to bring it into a context that is relevant to my reality. The video celebrates all of the things Riot Grrrl stood for, however it's a new age grrrl gang that is intersectional, black, queer and unapologetic. The people in the music video are all involved in really progressive projects in the city, so they are not just models, they are people who carry the spirit of my music. I believe we belong to the same community. When my EP releases in November, I will accompany it with a zine. Some of the artists who contributed to the zine are also featured in the video."

Watch the music video and stream the song below. You can also check out the behind the scenes clips underneath.



Read: Shekhinah Showcases Shades of 'Different' on Her Latest Video

Film
(Youtube)

10 African Films That Deal With Protest Culture & History

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression, and this has been represented significantly in cinema.

Around the world, Nigerians in the diaspora have picked up the mantle of protesting peacefully against police brutality and violence. These gatherings are a direct extension of the nationwide protests that were brought to a tragic halt in Lagos after soldiers of the Nigerian army fired guns at peaceful protesters at the Lekki tollgate venue.

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression and this has been represented significantly in cinema. This list, while not an exhaustive one, attempts to contextualize this rich cinematic history, tracing the complex and diverse ways that protest culture have been reflected in African film. From influential classics that are now considered required viewing to fascinating portraits of individual resistance, these films are proof that the struggle continues, regardless.

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