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Dope Saint Jude: Hip-Hop, Feminism, Race Politics & Cape Town Queer Culture

Cape Flats-born rapper Dope Saint Jude talks hip-hop, feminism, race politics and Cape Town queer culture.

Catherine St Jude Pretorius, otherwise known as Dope Saint Jude, is a socially conscious advocate for feminism, body politics, class, race and gender neutrality in Cape Town. Born in the Cape Flats, Miss St Jude brings a slightly controversial, edgy and playful energy to the music scene, particularly within the coloured community. In addition to rapping, she's also guest lectured on hip-hop as a social vehicle at a few of Cape Town's top universities.


After landing on our radar a year ago with "Hit Politik," she's since released videos for "The Golden Ratio" and most recently "Keep In Touch," featuring new kid on the "Nu-Queer" block Angel-Ho. Shot and edited by Chris Kets (who previously worked on Boolz' Langa-shot "Aphe Kapa"), the clip sports a quirky array of voguing ninjas, bucket hats and brief vocabulary lesson in Gayle (Cape Town queer slang). On the heels of her latest video, Dope Saint Jude spoke with us about Cape Town queer culture, being a "boss bitch" and a coloured woman in Cape Town's rap scene and more.

Shiba for Okayafrica: So tell us a bit about Gayle ("gay slang used in urban communities of South Africa"). I've never heard it used in music before, is there a reason for that?

Dope Saint Jude: Gayle is Cape Town queer urban slang created by predominantly coloured men. It was created as a secret language for queer people to communicate with one another in spaces where being queer was considered deviant. I first came across Gayle hanging out with friends in the Cape Flats. I immediately picked up the language as it is extremely colourful and expressive! I did further research into the language and found it hard to find an online dictionary for it. This is because the Gayle language is constantly evolving and is picked up by spending time in communities where Gayle is spoken. One really needs to immerse oneself in the culture to pick up the language.

OKA: And you? What does the persona of Dope Saint Jude encompass and how does "Keep In Touch" emulate that?

DSJ: Dope Saint Jude is so many things, but if I can convey one important thing about me it is that Dope Saint Jude is an example to all girls. Dope Saint Jude is an academic, a thug, a rapper, a hustler, an activist, a producer, a community worker, a filmmaker, a party animal, a lover, a sista and a BOSS BITCH! 2015 is an exciting year for me because I am dropping my EP and mixtape, a few more music videos and I am directing my first documentary. I am also facilitating my community project called iNtombi Workshop, where we focus on arts education at a high school in Elsies River, my hometown.

OKA: As a coloured woman in Cape Town's rap scene, how do you see your presence being felt?

DSJ: My coloured identity has always been a difficult thing for me to deal with. I am a first generation coloured person, as I come from a mixed race family. I recognise my blackness, even though I am coloured. I feel a great sense of responsibility to my community and to young women, to be a role model and to work hard. I think it is so important for us to have our voices heard, to change voice of the media and to create the climate we want in South Africa!

Keep up with Dope Saint Jude on Facebook, Twitter, SoundCloud, and Tumblr. Download "Keep In Touch" here.

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15 South African Artists to Watch in 2019

Featuring Manu WolrdStar, Ranks, Dee Koala, Touchline, Sibu Nzuza and more.

Every year a wave of artists breaks in South Africa.

Last year saw young artists such as Mlindo The Vocalist, Muzi, Una Rams, Shekhinah, Sho Madjozi, KLY, Zoocci Coke Dope, Flame, J Molley, Rowlene and a whole lot more become household names and internet sensations. They released projects that shaped the country's musical landscape—a lot of them were on our list of 20 artists who could fuck up the game in 2018.

Alongside the aforementioned artists, there were just as many who were bubbling under, releasing singles that caught the attention of many fans. In 2019, these artists stand a great chance of expanding further and reaching more ears than they did last year.

From Manu WorldStar's lovely pop, to Ranks' version of ATM (African trap music), the refreshing Xhosa rap of Dee Koala, the street raps of Touchline, among others, we bring you a list of South African artists to keep an eye out for in 2019.

*The list is in no particular order.

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Netflix Has Picked Up an Animated Musical Inspired by Shona Mythology

"Tunga" is the brainchild of Zimbabwean-born screenwriter Godwin Jabangwe.

The latest African story to become a Netflix original will be an animated, family-friendly musical based on Zimbabwean culture, Deadline reports. The streaming service won a four-way bidding battle for Tunga, created by Zimbabwean-born screenwriter and newcomer to the film industry Godwin Jabangwe.

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Burna Boy Teams Up With Oritse Femi & Konshens on New Track 'Play Am'

Nigeria meets Jamaica on the Young D-produced dancehall-infused jam.

Fresh off his massive collaboration with Zlatan on "Killin' Dem," Burna Boy is back with another one.

The artist teams up with fellow Nigerian artist Oritse Femi and Jamaican artist Konshens for the dancehall-infused track "Play Am."

The song opens with a memorable verse from Konshens before both Oritse Femi and Burna join in, making for a unique fusion of Yoruba, Patois and Pidgin over the track's vibrant, multilayered production by producer Young D.

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