Video

Dope Saint Jude: Hip-Hop, Feminism, Race Politics & Cape Town Queer Culture

Cape Flats-born rapper Dope Saint Jude talks hip-hop, feminism, race politics and Cape Town queer culture.

Catherine St Jude Pretorius, otherwise known as Dope Saint Jude, is a socially conscious advocate for feminism, body politics, class, race and gender neutrality in Cape Town. Born in the Cape Flats, Miss St Jude brings a slightly controversial, edgy and playful energy to the music scene, particularly within the coloured community. In addition to rapping, she's also guest lectured on hip-hop as a social vehicle at a few of Cape Town's top universities.


After landing on our radar a year ago with "Hit Politik," she's since released videos for "The Golden Ratio" and most recently "Keep In Touch," featuring new kid on the "Nu-Queer" block Angel-Ho. Shot and edited by Chris Kets (who previously worked on Boolz' Langa-shot "Aphe Kapa"), the clip sports a quirky array of voguing ninjas, bucket hats and brief vocabulary lesson in Gayle (Cape Town queer slang). On the heels of her latest video, Dope Saint Jude spoke with us about Cape Town queer culture, being a "boss bitch" and a coloured woman in Cape Town's rap scene and more.

Shiba for Okayafrica: So tell us a bit about Gayle ("gay slang used in urban communities of South Africa"). I've never heard it used in music before, is there a reason for that?

Dope Saint Jude: Gayle is Cape Town queer urban slang created by predominantly coloured men. It was created as a secret language for queer people to communicate with one another in spaces where being queer was considered deviant. I first came across Gayle hanging out with friends in the Cape Flats. I immediately picked up the language as it is extremely colourful and expressive! I did further research into the language and found it hard to find an online dictionary for it. This is because the Gayle language is constantly evolving and is picked up by spending time in communities where Gayle is spoken. One really needs to immerse oneself in the culture to pick up the language.

OKA: And you? What does the persona of Dope Saint Jude encompass and how does "Keep In Touch" emulate that?

DSJ: Dope Saint Jude is so many things, but if I can convey one important thing about me it is that Dope Saint Jude is an example to all girls. Dope Saint Jude is an academic, a thug, a rapper, a hustler, an activist, a producer, a community worker, a filmmaker, a party animal, a lover, a sista and a BOSS BITCH! 2015 is an exciting year for me because I am dropping my EP and mixtape, a few more music videos and I am directing my first documentary. I am also facilitating my community project called iNtombi Workshop, where we focus on arts education at a high school in Elsies River, my hometown.

OKA: As a coloured woman in Cape Town's rap scene, how do you see your presence being felt?

DSJ: My coloured identity has always been a difficult thing for me to deal with. I am a first generation coloured person, as I come from a mixed race family. I recognise my blackness, even though I am coloured. I feel a great sense of responsibility to my community and to young women, to be a role model and to work hard. I think it is so important for us to have our voices heard, to change voice of the media and to create the climate we want in South Africa!

Keep up with Dope Saint Jude on Facebook, Twitter, SoundCloud, and Tumblr. Download "Keep In Touch" here.

News Brief

Watch Dope Saint Jude And Her Friends Living Their Best Lives in The Music Video For ‘Liddy’

Watch the South African rapper's latest carefree music video.

Dope Saint Jude's new music video takes you through a day in the life of the rapper and her friends. The video is teeming with character, as the crew gets up to the kinds of shenanigans friends engage in when they are together—from being naughty at a grocery store, causing a scene on the train, and hitting the club, where they end up beating up a man who tries to force himself into their space as they have fun.

Keep reading... Show less
Music
Beat Bangaz. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Beat Bangaz’ New Album ‘7785 Disrupters’ Is a Grand Gathering of Cape Town’s Finest MCs

The legendary trio's debut album features the A-listers of Cape Town hip-hop.

Cape Town DJ and producer trio Beat Bangaz (DJ Ready D, E-20 and DJ Azuhl) is South African hip-hop royalty. And their debut album, 7785 Disrupters, matches their stature.

The project features the A-listers of Cape Town hip-hop, from both the old and the new school. Look out for appearances from the likes of Uno July, Deff Eff, Kanyi, YoungstaCPT, Driemanskap, EJ Von Lyrik, Andy Mkosi, Linkris The Genius, Early B, Cream, Chase, Dope Saint Jude and a whole lot more.

Keep reading... Show less
News Brief
Shatta Wale in "Borjor"

Start Your Weekend Early With Shatta Wale's 'Borjor'

The Ghanaian star shares the new track and music video for "Borjor" on his birthday.

Shatta Wale is celebrating his birthday by dropping a new track that's sure to get you in party mode.

"Borjor" is an addictive new song built on a mid-tempo afro-fusion beat work and led by the Ghanaian dancehall heavyweight's vocals about the object of his desire.

The accompanying music video, directed by PKMI, follows Shatta Wale and his friends to a day of swimming and messing around in a pool and mansion.

Shatta Wale recently dropped the level-up anthem "Swizz Bank," he also hopped on the same riddim as Vybz Kartel's hit "Any Weather," produced by Shabdon Records.

Watch the new music video for Shatta Wale's "Borjor" below.

For all the best & latest Ghanaian music, follow our new GHANA WAVE playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Still from YouTube

Michael Kiwanuka Pays Homage to the Black Liberation Movements of the '60s In New Video 'Hero'

The artist's latest single references some of his personal heroes including Malcolm X, Fred Hampton, Tupac Shakur and more.

British-Ugandan soul singer Michael Kiwanuka drops another single ahead of the release of his forthcoming album, KIWANUKA.

In "Hero" the singer pays homage to the Black Power and Civil Rights movements of the 1960s and 70s. The music video, directed by CC Wade references several Black leaders and some of the artist's personal heroes including Malcolm X, Fred Hampton, Martin Luther King Jr., Sam Cooke, Tupac Shakur, Marvin Gaye and more. It also depicts the FBI's often illegal efforts to stop Black movements and other anti-establishment groups through its Counterintelligence Program, as noted in Rolling Stone.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.