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This Official is on Trial for His Alleged Role in the Rwandan Genocide

71-year-old Fabien Neretse has been charged with 13 murders which took place between April and July of 1994.

Seventy-one-year-old Fabien Neretse, a former senior Rwandan official, appeared in a Brussels court in Belgium yesterday. He is currently on trial for his alleged involvement in 13 murders which occurred during the 1994 Rwandan genocide. According to News24, this is the first time a Belgian case has explicitly charged Neretse with genocide.


Back in 2011, Neretse was arrested by the French but was not placed in detention. He continues to proclaim his innocence till this day. Yesterday's proceedings, however, focused on the selection of the jury and thus Neretse has not appeared in the dock as yet. The first hearing is set to take place this Thursday.

In 1994, Rwanda experienced a genocide that was a result of ethnic cleansing. The Hutu people, who were the ethnic majority at the time, murdered at least 800 000 Tutsi people, an ethnic minority. Following the Hutu revolution in 1959, thousands of Tutsis fled the country and left behind an even smaller minority. The murders were carried out by Hutu nationalists and extremists initially in the capital of Kigali and then spread to the rest of the country.

A Belgian citizen named Claire Beckers, who was a shopkeeper in Kigali, was murdered in April of the genocide along with her husband Isaïe Bucyana (a Tutsi) and their daughter Katia Bucyana. Beckers' sister, Martine Beckers, was the one who lodged a complaint with Belgian prosecutors who now believe that Neretse was a leader in the area and directed the mass murders of Tutsis residing there.

Interestingly enough, Belgium was the colonizer of Rwanda and is held partially responsible by some for stoking ethnic tensions. The country's 1993 law allows the country to exercise universal jurisdiction with regards to prosecuting individuals who participated in genocides, war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Interview

Interview: Wavy The Creator Is Ready to See You Now

The multidisciplinary Nigerian-American artist on tapping into all her creative outlets, creating interesting things, releasing a new single and life during quarantine.

A trip canceled, plans interrupted, projects stalled. It is six months now since Wavy the Creator has had to make a stop at an undisclosed location to go into quarantine and get away from the eye of the pandemic.

The professional recording artist, photographer, writer, fashion artist, designer, and evolving creative has been spending all of this time in a house occupied by other creatives. This situation is ideal. At least for an artist like Wavy who is always in a rapid motion of creating and bringing interesting things to life. The energy around the house is robust enough to tap from and infuse into any of her numerous creative outlets. Sometimes, they also inspire trips into new creative territories. Most recently, for Wavy, are self-taught lessons on a bass guitar.

Wavy's days in this house are not without a pattern, of course. But some of the rituals and personal rules she drew up for herself, like many of us did for internal direction, at the beginning of the pandemic have been rewritten, adjusted, and sometimes ditched altogether. Some days start early and end late. Some find her at her sewing machine fixing up thrift clothes to fit her taste, a skill she picked up to earn extra cash while in college, others find her hard at work in the studio, writing or recording music.

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