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Photo credit should read Stephanie Aglietti/AFP via Getty Images.

The 53-year old former mayor is to be tried on nine counts of genocide, crimes against humanity and violating the Geneva Conventions during the 1994 genocide in which around 800,000 people were killed, mostly ethnic Tutsis.

Former Politician Ladislas Ntaganzwa Convicted for Role in Rwandan Genocide

The ex-mayor has been sentenced to life for plotting and ordering the killing of thousands of Tutsis during Rwanda's 1994 genocide.

Former politician Ladislas Ntaganzwa has recently been convicted for his instrumental role in the infamous Rwandan genocide, according to Aljazeera. The ex-mayor of Nyakizu has been sentenced to life for plotting and ordering the killing of more than 25 000 Tutsis in what remains one of the darkest times in the country's history close to three decades later.

Ntaganzwa was initially indicted by the Tanzania-based International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda two years after the genocide, on charges of direct and public incitement to commit genocide, murder and rape. However, after the tribunal closed, the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals, with offices in Arusha and The Hague, Netherlands, took over the case.

A statement released by the prosecution body, partially reads as follows: "[We have] convicted him for genocide, extermination as crime against humanity and rape as crime against humanity and sentenced him to life imprisonment. [However, we have] not found [him] guilty of murder as crime against humanity and direct and public incitement to commit genocide."

Responding to the court's conviction, Ntaganzwa's lawyer Alexis Musonera says, "It's a guilty verdict. The court has sentenced him to life in prison." Musonera adds that, "Overall we are not satisfied with the ruling. We are going to appeal."

Additionally, 84-year-old Félicien Kabuga was arrested earlier this month for his alleged involvement in the genocide. The arrest follows an indictment made back in 1997 which saw Kabuga living under a false identity and on the run for 23 years. Previously the wealthiest man in Rwanda before the genocide, he is accused of having aided the financial backing of Hutu militias who went on to slaughter about 800,000 Tutsis in total.

Whether Kabuga will be tried in France or in Rwanda is currently the subject of much debate.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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