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George Clooney Is Giving $1 Million to Investigate War Criminals In Africa—But Who Asked?

"If it walks like a 'white savior' and talks like a 'white savior'—it usually is."

Tuxedo in human form, George Clooney, announced today that he will give $1 million towards an investigation into governments and authorities that benefit from continued support of conflict in Africa. He's doing so through his "The Sentry" initiative which the actor launched in 2015 to "end wars" in Africa.


"Our focus is to make sure that war crimes don't pay," said the actor in a statement. "We want to make it more difficult for those willing to kill en masse to secure their political and economic objectives." "When we're able to go after the warlords' wallets and bankrupt those who choose the bullet over the ballot, suddenly the incentives are for peace, not war; transparency, not corruption."

As BBC Africa reports, this is far from the first time that Clooney's inserted himself in African affairs. Clooney along with the likes of Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, was part of the bizarre 2012 honey trap scheme to arrest Ugandan warlord, Joseph Kony. In 2011, the actor took part in a program that used satellites to monitor the Sudanese-South Sudanese border. He was also one of the most vocal celebrity advocates during the 2006 crisis in Darfur.

His constant involvement in African politics comes across as a fixation with aiding "poor, helpless Africans"—an approach more rooted in self-seeking, white maleness than anything it might purport to be. And since when has male whiteness ever benefited Africa? What proof is there that any of his actions have ever truly payed off? Has he helped end a single war? Did Clooney save Darfur? I'm sure we all remember how "Kony 2012" turned out.

This is not to say that his efforts are completely in vain, it's merely a suggestion that he not regard the continent as a playing field that he can visit whenever he wants to practice being a good samaritan, especially when he lives in a country with an excess of its own political troubles. It's as if for him, fighting social ills within an African context give his efforts more validity, which, once again, plays into the ever-harmful, "Africa as foreground for despair" trope.

As Clooney is all too aware, there are indeed very real issues affecting the continent that deserve our vigorous action and unreserved attention. What he should, perhaps, be more cognizant of is the fact that his efforts come off as if he is relentlessly vying to be the captain of "Team Save Africa," and he cannot humanly fulfill that role, nor is anyone asking him to.

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Sarkodie Is Not Feeling Any Pressure

The elite Ghanaian rapper affirms his king status with this seventh studio album, No Pressure.

Sarkodie is one of the most successful African rappers of all time. With over ten years of industry presence under his belt, there's no question about his prowess or skin in the game. Not only is he a pioneer of African hip-hop, he's also the most decorated African rapper, having received over 100 awards from close to 200 nominations over the span of his career.

What else does Sarkodie have to prove? For someone who has reached and stayed at the pinnacle of hip-hop for more than a decade, he's done it all. But despite that, he's still embracing new growth. One can tell just by listening to his latest album, No Pressure, Sarkodie's seventh studio album, and the follow-up to 2019's Black Love which brought us some of the Ghanaian star's best music so far. King Sark may be as big as it gets, but the scope of his music is still evolving.

Sonically, No Pressure is predominantly hip-hop, with the first ten tracks offering different blends of rap topped off with a handful of afrobeats and, finally, being crowned at the end with a gospel hip-hop cut featuring Ghanaian singer MOG. As far as the features go, Sark is known for collaborating mostly with his African peers but this time around he branches out further to feature a number of guests from around the world. Wale, Vic Mensa, and Giggs, the crème de la crème of rap in America and the UK respectively all make appearances, as well as Nigeria's Oxlade, South Africa's Cassper Nyovest, and his fellow Ghanaian artists Darkovibes and Kwesi Arthur.

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The 7 Best Nigerian Songs of the Month (July)

Featuring Olamide, Lady Donli, Omah Lay, Adekunle Gold, Falz and more.

Here are the best and most noteworthy Nigerian tracks we had on repeat this month.

Follow our NAIJA HITS playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

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The 10 Best Ghanaian Songs of the Month (July)

Featuring Black Sherif, Sarkodie, Stonebwoy, M3NSA x M.anifest, and more.

As the summer winds down releases have slowed down just a tad, but it's nothing to fear because a number of our Ghanaian music faves are in album mode, and it's only a matter of time before they let loose! In the meantime the rest of our faves have been steady dishing out that fire, making for another month of dope releases. Want the scoop? Check out the best Ghanaian songs of the month below!

Follow our GHANA WAVE playlist on Spotify here and Apple Music here.

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The 7 Best East African Songs of the Month (July)

Featuring Nandy, Juicee Mann, Alikiba, Diamond Platnumz and more.