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EBRAHIM HAMID/AFP via Getty Images.

EBRAHIM HAMID/AFP via Getty Images.

Sudan Has Launched an Investigation into Crimes Committed During the Darfur Conflict

The state prosecutor says the investigation will focus on "cases against former regime leaders."

Tagelsir al-Heber, Sudan's state prosecutor, has announced the country's investigation into crimes committed during the Darfur conflict under former President Omar al-Bashir, BBC reports.

The conflict and subsequent crimes committed in the Darfur region from 2003 left around 300,000 people dead and 2.5 million people displaced, France24 adds. Warrants for al-Bashir's arrest were launched by the International Criminal Court (ICC) both in 2009 and 2010 on genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity charges. He has yet to be extradited to face trial for those charges.


al-Herber says the investigation will focus on "cases against former regime leaders" (including the numerous incidents of murder and rape) and hinted the trial could occur outside of the country at The Hague's International Criminal Court. Names were not revealed, though he adds that no one would be excluded from the trial.

Bashir was sentenced to two years in prison for corruption in the first of ongoing charges against him—including an investigation for his role in the 1989 coup that led him into power.

Sudan's transitional government has committed to make peace in regions hit by conflict, including Darfur, since coming into power after the movement that toppled Bashir.

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Sudanese women chant slogans during a demonstration demanding a civilian body to lead the transition to democracy, outside the army headquarters in the Sudanese capital Khartoum on April 12, 2019. - Sudanese protestors vowed on April 12 to chase out the country's new military rulers, as the army offered talks on forming a civilian government after it ousted president Omar al-Bashir. (Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP/Getty Images)

Sudan’s Revolution Isn't a Fluke—It's Tradition

How Sudanese protesters tapped into their country's rich history of revolt to overthrow a dictator.

"The dawn has come, Atbara has arrived"

This was the chant bellowed by hundreds of people in Khartoum on Tuesday, April 23, as they tearfully welcomed in the train from Atbara, a city 300 kilometers away from the capital. The train was not only filled to capacity, it was overflowing with citizens both inside and on top of the train waving victory signs, posters, banners and Sudanese flags. The videos and stills from that day recorded a historic moment—and a full circle one, harkening back to the first major protest five months earlier on December 19, 2018.

On the other side of the world, I sat in front of my computer screen watching the train roll in and cried, for what felt like the millionth time that week.

Since April 6, the international community has been trying to understand what's happening in Sudan—its scope and significance.

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Sudanese protesters chant slogans and flash the victory gesture with a national flag at the protest outside the army headquarters in the capital Khartoum on May 14, 2019. (Photo by Mohamed el-Shahed / AFP) (Photo credit should read MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images)

Protestors and Military in Sudan Have Agreed to a Three-Year Government Transition

"We vow to our people that the agreement will be completed fully within 24 hours in a way that it meets the people's aspirations," says Sudan's top army General.

The Sudanese military and the country's opposition have agreed to a three-year transition period into full civilian rule, reports Al Jazeera.

Lieutenant General Yasser al-Atta told reporters on Wednesday, that a new agreement between the military and the protest group Alliance for Freedom and Change would be signed within 24 hours. "We agreed on a transitional period of three years," he announced. "We vow to our people that the agreement will be completed fully within 24 hours in a way that it meets the people's aspirations," said Atta.

The decision comes after the army seized power following the overthrow of long-time president Omar al-Bashir last month. While his ousting was viewed as a victory won by the people, many protestors rejected the military's decision to take over and plans for a two-year military-led take over.

READ: Sudan's Revolution Isn't a Fluke—It's Tradition

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(Photo by Jack Vartoogian/Getty Images)

Blitz the Ambassador Named 2020 Guggenheim Fellow

The Ghanaian artist and filmmaker is among 175 "individuals who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts."

Ghanaian filmmaker Blitz Bazawule, also known as Blitz the Ambassador has been named a 2020 Guggenheim fellow.

The musician, artist and director behind he critically acclaimed film The Burial of Kojo, announced the news via social media on Thursday, writing: "Super excited to announce I've been awarded the Guggenheim 2020 Fellowship. Truly grateful and inspired."

He is among 175 scholars, "appointed on the basis of prior achievement and exceptional promise, the successful candidates were chosen from a group of almost 3,000 applicants in the Foundation's ninety-sixth competition," says the Guggenheim.

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Culture
Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

6 South African Podcasts to Listen to During the Lockdown

Here are six South African podcasts worth listening to.

South Africa has been on lockdown for almost two weeks as a measure to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus, and it looks like the period might just get extended. If you are one of those whose work can't be done from home, then you must have a lot of time in your hands. Below, we recommend six South African podcasts you can occupy yourself with and get empowered, entertained and informed.


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