News Brief
Giannis Antetokounmpo, winner of the Kia NBA Most Valuable Player award, poses in the press room during the 2019 NBA Awards presented by Kia on TNT at Barker Hangar on June 24, 2019 in Santa Monica, California. (Photo by Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Turner Sports)

Giannis Antetokounmpo Named 'Most Valuable Player' at 2019 NBA Awards

The Greek-Nigerian forward is the third youngest player to win the award in 40 years.

Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks, was named MVP at the NBA Awards on Monday.

With his win, the Greek-born, Nigerian player has become the third youngest player to win the award in 40 years, after Derrick Rose and LeBron James.

The 24-year-old forward, beat out the likes of James Harden, Paul George, Nikola Jokic and Steph Curry, to earn the most first-place votes. He earned a total of 78 out of the 101 possible first-place voted, as ESPN reports.

He is the second Buck to win the award, following the legendary Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.


Antetokounmpo was a strong contender for the title, as the player, nicknamed "The Greek Freak," helped lead his team to the Eastern Conference Finals. He averaged 27.7 points per game this season, as well as 12.5 rebounds and 5.9 assists.

Upon accepting his award on Monday, the athlete gave an emotional speech, thanking God, his teammates and family, and remembering his late father. Watch the heartfelt moment below.

"MVP is not about stats and numbers," said Antetokounmpo on Monday. "It is all about winning and all about making sure you go out there and do everything you can to win. I think that is what we did as a team."

The star athlete is one of the league's most impressive players. Earlier this year, the player was named All-Star Captain for the Eastern Conference team at the NBA All-Star Games.

popular
Photo still via TIFF.

Watch the Striking Trailer for 'Farming'—Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje's Directorial Debut

This is a must-watch.

The trailer for Farming, Nigerian-British actor Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje's directorial debut, is here.

"Between the 1960s and the 1980s, thousands of Nigerian children were farmed out to white working class families in the UK," the trailer begins. "This is the true story of just one of them."

Keep reading... Show less
Politics
Image by Fibonacci Blue via Flickr.

#IStandWithIlhan: Supporters Rally Behind Ilhan Omar Following Racist 'Send Her Back' Chant

"I am here where I belong, at the people's house, and you're just going to have to deal,"—Congresswoman Ilhan Omar

Social media continues to rally behind Representative Ilhan Omar, following a series of racist remarks targeted at her and several other congresswoman of color by President Donald Trump.

The president doubled down on his racist rhetoric during a re-election rally in North Carolina on Wednesday, attendees began chanting "send her back," referring to Omar—echoing anti-imigrant remarks that the president tweeted last week, in which he wrote that four congresswomen of color: Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ayanna Pressley and Rashida Tlaib should "go back" to where they came from.

This is far from the first time that Omar has been on the receiving end of racist and Islamophobic attacks and referred to as un-American on account of her Somali heritage.

READ: Op-Ed: In Defense of the Black Boogeyman

Keep reading... Show less
popular
Sir Elvis in "Loving Man" (Youtube)

6 African Country Musicians You Should Check Out

Featuring Sir Elvis, Jess Sah Bi & Peter One, Emma Ogosi and more.

With Lil Nas X's EP going straight to number on the American charts, it seems like country music revival is taking over 2019 and beyond, thanks to its unlikely fusion with trap music. It only makes sense that black people are reclaiming the genre, as country was actually partly created by black American artists and heavily influenced by gospel music.

On top of that, plenty of lesser known black artists and bands are making country, or country-infused, music. This is especially the case in Africa, where the genre has been around for a few decades and an increasing number of musicians are gaining momentum. By gaining popularity in Africa, country is coming back to its roots, as country guitar and the way of playing it was originally inspired by the banjo— an instrument that African slaves brought with them to America.

Country music has a strong appeal across the African continent for several reasons: the similarity with many African instruments and the recurring lyrics and themes about love, heartbreak and "the land." At the heart of it, country music has an appeal to working class people all over the world who feel let down by the people that were supposed to help them.

Country music is played regularly on the radio in countries such as Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi but yet, the artists featured are overwhelmingly white and American. African country singers do not get the respect they deserve or are seen as anomalies. With the growing number of them making country music, here is a list of the ones you need to listen to right now.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.

popular.