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Ibeyi Interview Each Other For Okayafrica TV

Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz, the Ibeyi twin sisters, interview each other for the first time ever on Okayafrica TV.


The last time Okayafrica TV caught up with Ibeyi the French-Cuban twins were just about to play their first ever show in New York City. After releasing their self-titled debut album under XL Recordings and setting out on an extensive tour of Europe and the U.S., this Saturday the Diaz sisters will return to NYC to perform their Yoruba-influenced blend of electronic and hip-hop sounds, elegies and spirituals in front of 6,000 strong at Central Park for Okayplayer presents SummerStage with Ibeyi and their label-mate Jungle and Sunni Colón. Ahead of the show we're excited to premiere a very special episode of Okayafrica TV with the Ibeyi twins.

In the video above, sisters Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé interview each other for the first time ever down at the OkayHouse in Austin, Texas, during SXSW. Who are their favorite twins? What's next for Ibeyi? Who would they set each other up on dates with? What's their favorite thing about each other? The answer to these and more in the latest episode of Okayafrica TV.

See Ibeyi perform live this Saturday, June 20th, at Okayplayer and SummerStage present Jungle, Ibeyi, and Sunni Colón in Central Park, NYC.

Interview
Photo: Mariela Alvarez.

Interview: ÌFÉ Blends Music & Religion to Honor Those Who Have Died During the Pandemic

Producer and percussionist Otura Mun talks about his latest EP, The Living Dead, and how he traces the influences of West Africa in his new work.

There are bands that open up a spiritual world through their music. ÌFÉ is one example. An electro-futurist band that fuses Afro-Cuban rhythms and Jamaican dancehall with Yoruba mystical voices. With the success of their 2017 debut album "IIII+IIII" (pronounced Eji-Ogbe), ÌFÉ has reached an audience that is looking for Caribbean and contemporary sounds.

The Puerto Rican-based band just released a new EP, The Living Dead- Ashé Bogbo Egun, that aims to heal and honor those who have died during this pandemic. Otura Mun, the band leader, is an African-American producer and percussionist, who began a personal journey about a decade ago, when he landed in San Juan, and decided to move there. He learned Spanish, dug deep into his African ancestry and started to practice the Yoruba-Caribbean religion of Santería.

ÌFÉ, which means "love and expansion" in Yoruba, ties two worlds, music and religion, artistically. This new EP modernized prayer songs to hopefully make them more accessible to a younger generation. OkayAfrica spoke with Otura Mun on his latest work.

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