News Brief

Eastern Cape Cinemas Cancel ‘Inxeba’ Screenings Probably Due To Threats

Many feel the movie is disrespectful towards the Xhosa custom of ulwaluko.

Two cinemas in the Eastern Cape province have cancelled the screenings of the movie Inxeba (The Wound), which were due to take place today, TimesLIVE reports.


Hemingways Mall in East London announced this morning on the mall's Facebook page that the scheduled screening was "suspended." No reason was given for the suspension.


Walmer Park Shopping Centre in Port Elizabeth reportedly did the same.

The screenings are highly likely canceled due to the outcry about the movie.

The hashtag #InxebaMustFall has been used by those who feel the movie should be boycotted. The Wound is accused of showing the sacred Xhosa custom of ulwaluko–the rite of passage for Xhosa boys into manhood. A custom which must not be shown to the general public.

Since the movie's trailer was released last year, there has been a huge outcry, mostly from Xhosa men.

Singer Nakhane Touré, one of the main actors in the film, has even received death threats from those who feel he is selling Xhosa culture for profit.

Those who have seen the film have voiced that the outrage is misguided as most of us have only seen the trailer, and not the full movie.

The movie's producer Elias Ribeiro was quoted by TimesLIVE echoing the same sentiments:

"We've shown the film to whoever wanted to watch it. We were prepared for the backlash but have decided to just let the audience decide. I have yet to meet a person who has watched this film and still have an issue with it. Having said that, we hope love not hate will prevail this week. We hope the threats against the film will not materialize."
Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

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