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Juls Explores a New Sound in 'Normal' Featuring Kojey Radical

The producer takes a step away from afrobeats in this new single and video.

Juls has constantly been on rotation for years for his own hits as well as productions alongside Mr Eazi, Burna Boy, Wande Coal which, as we wrote last year when he released Leap of Faith, have put him at the forefront of the afrobeats movement.

The British-Ghanaian producer is now sharing "Normal," the first taste of his upcoming album. The song sees Juls making a clear departure from the afrobeats grooves we're accustomed to hearing from him, exchanging them for a darker UK grime-influenced production. And it definitely works.

"I don't want to be the go-to guy when you just want afrobeats," Juls told The FADER. "I grew up listening to a lot of music. With this project that I'm working on, I want to show different elements of what I'm doing."

The single also features some heavy bars from London-based artist Kojey Radical, who we named one of our 10 UK Acts to Watch last year.

Watch the new music video for "Normal," which was directed by Juls himself, below.


Interview
Image courtesy of Kojey Radical.

Interview: Kojey Radical On the Importance of His Dual British-Ghanaian Identity

The British-Ghanaian artist talks about growing up in East London, getting in touch with his Ghanaian heritage and his new project, Cashmere Tears.

In this age of technology, "creative" is a blanket term facilitating the spread of multiple talents, which is readily seen in copious social media bios. The phrase "Jack of all trades, master of none," springs to mind in that respect, yet now and again an artist follows the path of the polymath and blooms.

Kojey Radical is one who belies his young years as a studious figure who incorporates a myriad of experimentation via spoken word, fashion, design and music, just (to name a few.

Born Kwadwo Adu Genfi Amponsah in London, of Ghanaian descent, Kojey has navigated the underground with a number of insightful and acclaimed projects tracing his own identity as he builds visual narratives themes on depression, love and God.

Following the recent release of Cashmere Tears, we speak to the accomplished artist on growing up in London, the experience of dual heritage, and headlining his first festival this year.

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"Cake" single art.

Listen to Juls and Mr Eazi's New Single 'Cake'

Juls shares another single ahead of the release of his forthcoming album "Colour."

Frequent collaborators Juls and Mr Eazi, link up once again on "Cake."

The two-and-a-half minute track sees Mr Eazi singing about his love interest's derrière atop mid tempo production. On the catchy chorus, the artist references DJ Tjaey's 2017 hit, "Look Like You," dropping lines about a girl who gives him a "sugar rush."

The two previously worked together on Mr Eazi's massive single "Skintight," as well as the track "Hollup." Cake is another solid collaboration from the duo.

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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