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Kais Saied is Set to Become Tunisia's Next President

While official results have not been published, the retired academic reportedly secured 76 percent of the votes according to the exit polls.

Last week, Tunisia held its legislative elections, according to reports by Aljazeera. The Ennahda Movement obtained 52 seats in the 217-member parliament while the Karoui's Heart of Tunisia party came second, with 38 seats. While the presidential elections were only scheduled to take place in November, they were pushed forward after the country's first democratically-elected president, Beji Caid Essebsi, passed away in July. Two independent candidates, media mogul Nabil Karoui and retired law professor Kais Saied, have been facing off in the presidential runoff. However, recent exit polls suggest that Saied secured between 72 and 77 percent of the vote.


While the official results of the election will only be released later today, Saied's supporters took to the streets to celebrate his lead over this past weekend. On Friday, the two presidential candidates participated in a debate which 6 million Tunisians tuned in to watch. Saied spoke of fighting corruption and empowering the people although he said very little about actual policies he would put in place. Karoui, on the other hand, spoke of alleviating poverty and bringing in more jobs centered on technology. In the first round of voting, Saied and Karoui secured 18.4 and 15.6 percent of the vote respectively.

Karoui however, campaigned for the most part from prison after he was arrested on charges of money laundering and tax fraud. He was only released from prison a few days ago following a court order and maintains his innocence.

Speaking about his lead in the polls, Saied said that, "We will try to build a new Tunisia. Young people led this campaign, and I am responsible for them."

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(Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

Pregnant Tanzanian Girls Now Have Hope Of An Education

In the past, Tanzania's pregnant girls of school-going age were banned from accessing an education. However, things are about to change!

If a young girl of school-going age happened to fall pregnant in Tanzania, it usually spelled the end of her schooling career — and the death of any prospects she may have had for a bright future. In Tanzania currently, an estimated 5 500 girls are forced to leave school each year due to pregnancy, according to the World Bank.

The Tanzanian government has announced a new programme aimed at addressing the plight of young girls who have been impacted by this discriminatory ban. Tanzania's Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Leonard Akwilapo said young girls will now be offered an opportunity to further their schooling at alternative colleges.

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Nigerian Government Barred From Prosecuting Twitter Users

The Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States has ordered the Nigerian government to refrain from prosecuting Twitter users, while it considers the case brought to it by civil society organisations and journalists.