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MPs attend a plenary session to debate motion on French colonisation at the parliament in Tunis, Tunisia on June 09, 2020.

Tunisia's Bold Move to Demand Apology from French Colonisers Rejected

The motion to demand that France apologise to Tunisia for its colonisation has been rejected with politicians saying, 'We are not going to feed Tunisians with such motions.'

Tunisia's parliament has recently rejected a motion put forward by the Al-Karama coalition which demanded an apology from France for the "murder and torture, the brutality of French colonialism". Seifeddine Makhlouf, the leader of the coalition which currently occupies 19 of the 217 seats in parliament, had insisted that the apology would be a move towards "[healing] the wounds of the past". According to Aljazeera, the motion fell short by 109 votes needed for it to pass.

READ: Belgium Has Apologized to its Former African Colonies for Kidnapping their Mixed-Race Children

The details of the motion included the European country taking responsibility for the "crimes, assassinations, torture, rape, forced deportation and looting of natural resources" before Tunisia eventually obtained its independence in 1956.

However, resistance to the motion was voiced out by leader of the Qalb Tounes opposition party, Osama Khelifi, who said that, "We are not going to feed Tunisians with such motions." Ultimately, the significance of France as a trade partner in light of Tunisia's longstanding economic crisis swung the vote and moved for the motion to be dismissed.

Given the current climate, the motion was a bold move by Tunisian opposition leaders in their attempts to have the injustices of colonialism acknowledged. With the continued Black Lives Matter protests in America, and now several other countries in the world, colonialism and its various symbols have been cast into the spotlight as racist systems of oppression are being interrogated.

More recently, Belgian authorities removed the statue of King Leopold II from Antwerp square, amid the mass protests in the country. The monarch was responsible for the murder of an estimated 10 million Congolese people in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo.

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Bobi Wine's Release Detailed in Latest Episode of 'The Messenger'

Trauma is the topic on the podcast's latest episode: "The Ballot or The Bullet."

The latest episode of The Messenger is something to behold.

Created by Sudanese-American rapper Bas, The Messenger throws the spotlight on the thunderous circumstances many African countries face, with a close focus on Ugandan politician Bobi Wine.

In his most recent traumatic experience, Wine and his wife Barbara Itungo Kyagulanyi were released from a nearly two-week military house arrest following the ruling of a Ugandan court. Keeping up with current events and circumstances that Wine finds himself in, the latest episode of the podcast recounts the traumatic events that led to Wine's very public abuse and eventual house arrest.

Upon his release, Wine spoke with The Messenger and had this to say, "I want to remind the world that we went in this election knowing how corrupt the staff of the electoral commission is. We saw this through the campaign and the world saw how much was oppressed, how biased and one sided the electoral commission was, and how much it was in the full grip of General Museveni. And therefore we are going to test every legal test, we shall take every legal test. We shall take every legal step. And indeed we shall take every moral and morally proactive, nonviolent, but legal and peaceful step to see that we liberate ourselves. The struggle has not ended. It is just beginning."

Listen to Episode 7 of The Messenger here.

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