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A person holds an umbrella bearing the colors of the rainbow flag as others wave flags during a gay pride rally in Entebbe, Uganda. August 09, 2014. (Photo: ISAAC KASAMANI/AFP/Getty Images)

A Lesbian Woman, Who Fled Uganda for the US After a Homophobic Attack, Is Now Facing Deportation

The Trump administration does not believe she faces a threat in Uganda, despite the country recently threatening to re-introduce its "Kill the Gays" bill.

A lesbian woman who fled Uganda in the face of homophobic violence, now faces being deported from the US by the Trump administration.

According to a recent report published in Rolling Stone magazine, a Ugandan woman by the name of Margaret sought asylum in the US after being beaten and raped at a festival in Uganda known as a gathering place for the country's LGBTQ community. Following the attack, she entered the country through the US-Mexico border—a dangerous, yet increasingly common route for migrants coming from the continent.

In the Rolling Stone article, she recounts several of the hardships she faced as a lesbian woman coming of age in Uganda and as an African migrant seeking refuge in the US. "I pray that everything works out," Margaret told Rolling Stone. "Because it has been so tough. Ever since I was 13, I just wanted to be free, instead of hiding who I am. I just want to be free, that's all. And happy."


According to the Trump administration, Uganda's well-documented persecution of LGBTQ individuals is not reason enough to grant Margaret asylum. Instead, she faces being sent back. With the decision, the administration has chosen to ignore the Ugandan government's harmful track record with the LGBTQ community and has determined that they don't face a significant enough threat in their home country to warrant refuge in the US.

The move reflects the Trump's administration's staunch devotion to upholding its xenophobic, anti-immigrant agenda. The administration has also been lax around supporting LGBTQ rights.

Earlier this month, it was reported that Uganda was planning to re-introduce its highly denounced "Kill the Gays" bill which would make homosexuality punishable by death after the country's Ethics and Integrity Minister Simon Lokodo made the announcement. The government later denied the news, stating that it would not revive the bill, though the country still remains a hostile one for members of the LGBTQ community through its colonial-era penal code which makes homosexuality punishable by life imprisonment.

According to Reuters, four people have been killed in homophobic attacks in Uganda this year, including a transgender woman and three gay men, one of whom was killed earlier this month.

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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