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Lupita Nyong'o and John Boyega to Narrate Upcoming Wildlife Series 'Serengeti'

Cool or cliché?

Discovery and BBC Studios new natural history series Serengeti is in on its way and none other than two of the biggest actors of African descent are set to narrate it.

Lupita Nyong'o and John Boyega, who will soon reprise their roles in Star Wars: Episode IX, are set to narrate the U.S. and UK versions of the series, respectively, according to a Deadline report. The dramatized series will follow the lives of several species of wildlife in the famous region of northern Tanzania.


Here's a synopsis of the series via Deadline:

The six-part series, which is set to air later this year on BBC One and Discovery Channel, follows the interconnected stories of a cast of savannah animals over one year, in a bold new format. From warthogs to lions, mongoose to cheetahs, a cast of our favourite African animal characters will be filmed closer and more intimately than ever before, using groundbreaking filming techniques and pioneering technology, including drone technology and the use of multiple stabilised camera systems.

While we're willing to give the series a chance, based off the strength of the talent involved, we can't help but notice that it comes off at least slightly cliché to have two actors from the continent narrate a documentary about African wildlife.

Nonetheless, Nyong'o has shared her excitement over the upcoming project, calling it a "stunning and unique testament to a place that I have always loved."

"These beautiful creatures' stories are universal," she told Deadline. "And I am honored to help take the audience on their journey."

The series, produced by American Idol creator Simon Fuller's XIX Entertainment and John Downer Productions, will premiere later this year. We'll share further details as we learn more.

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The Oscars have Disqualified 'Joy', a Film about Nigerian Sex Workers, Submitted for Best International Feature Film

Like Genevieve Nnaji's 'Lionheart', the film has reportedly been disqualified by the Academy because of too much English dialogue.

It seems films from Nigeria or films about Nigerians can't seem to catch a break at the Oscars. Just last week, Genevieve Nnaji's Lionheart was disqualified from the Best International Feature Film category of the Oscars because of too much English dialogue. The film was Nigeria's first ever entry to the Oscars—a historic moment. Similarly, Austrian filmmaker Sudabeh Mortezai's Joy, a film about Nigerian sex workers living in Vienna, has also been disqualified by the Academy in the same category, according to Deadline.

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(Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Coachella)

Burna Boy to Donate Proceeds from Upcoming Show In South Africa to Victims of Xenophobic Violence

The "Africans Unite" concert is slated for this November, and the bill also includes Jidenna, Kwesta and more.

Burna Boy will return to South Africa for the first time following the recent the spate of xenophobic violence against Nigerians and other foreign African nationals.

In the height of the violence in September, Burna Boy vowed to never return to the country. Major Nigerian artists including Tiwa Savage cancelled appearances in the country, and echoed sentiments calling on the South African government to take adequate measures to protect foreign nationals. "I have not set foot in SA since 2017. And I will NOT EVER go to South Africa again for any reason until the SOUTH AFRICAN government wakes the f**k up and really performs A miracle because I don't know how they can even possibly fix this," he wrote on Twitter. A radio station in Zambia even banned music by South African artists from their airwaves following the violence.

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Image by Kabelenga Phiri.

Check out 'AKANTUNSE', a Visual Celebration of African Mythology

The speculative photo series by Zambian collective Kabumba, re-imagines nine significant figures in African mythology, cosmology and folklore.

Kabumba is a Zambian collective based in Lusaka that curates African visual art that seeks to push the limits on existing narratives within African art. AKANTUNSE is Kabumba's latest project—a fun and speculative photo series which celebrates nine figures in African mythology, cosmology and folklore.

We reached out to creative director, Chanda Karimamusama, who worked alongside photographer Kabelenga Phiri and make-up artist Mary Mthetwa, to find out what how AKANTUNSE came together.

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Photo by Jamal Nxedlana.

Afripedia is the Visual Platform Connecting African Artists to Their Clients

The newly launched platform wants to foster a strong community of African artists on the continent and in the diaspora.

Afripedia is live! The curated visual platform, which was created by Swedish production collective Stocktownfilms aims to do away with misrepresentation within the creative industry and connect African creatives to their clients by giving them increased exposure. The platform comes five years after an initial 5-part documentary series which focused on creatives in Angola, Ghana, South Africa, Kenya and Senegal.

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