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Photo courtesy of Alice Gbelia.

Meet the Ivorian Woman Behind the Online Platform Bringing Affordable Black Art to The World

Ayoka-Deco is Alice Gbelia's effort to make supporting young black artists easier, as well as give them a platform.

Ayoka-Deco is what happens when art, visibility and affordability come together.

For Alice Gbelia, the Ivorian-French entrepreneur behind the project, the idea to build an online platform for young, black artists came after she was in need of paintings for her new home. "I went to Instagram and found all these young, black artists," says Gbelia. "But it wasn't a smooth process to buy from them."

According to Gbelia, the problem was twofold. Not only was it difficult for interested parties to learn about new artists, but it was just as difficult for young artists, whose primary selling platforms were the internet and social media in particular to reach the kind of audience they wanted to. Another challenge for the artists, "was making that sure you were not selling yourself short," Rahana Dariah, a British-West Indian artist featured on the site, adds.

Gbelia then decided to step in to build a website focused solely promoting the art she enjoyed seeing on her walls, with the hope that others would too.


"A lot of these platforms are really huge and it's really hard to get on the main page," Gbelia says, in reference to Instagram and other art e-commerce platforms. "[Ayoka-Deco] is about getting artists better commission and exposure."

Art featured on Ayoka-Deco by Rahana Dariah. Image courtesy of Alice Gbelia.

Beyond that, Gbelia believes the site has also has a responsibility to diversify what kind of art people have access to. Price has always been a barrier to acquiring art for many, and the general consensus is that good art is too expensive to invest in, but Gbelia knows that's not true. "We are right in the middle," she says about the price points of artists featured on Ayoka-Deco, which range from under $50 to a little less than $100.

"It was really important for me to make it affordable. I want people to know that you don't have to be rich to appreciate art," Gbelia adds.

More than the price point, the art on the site is attainable in other ways. Dariah, whose colorful images of wide-eyed black girls with curly hair and locks grace the site, is one of the many portrait artists whose artwork live on Ayoka-Deco. According to Gbelia, this is an intentional decision. "I don't think there are enough portraits of black people," Gbelia muses. "I want people to be able to see art that looks like them." Beyond issues of representation, artists on the site present refreshing new narratives around feminism, race and the LGBTQ community.

When asked what the future looks like for the platform, Gbelia envisions a painting from Ayoka-Deco in every living room and the range of the site's other offerings—including stationery, fashion and tech accessories as a must have for everyone.

"I want to be like IKEA," Gbelia says, as she notes the Swedish-founded company's ubiquity in homes around the world. "I want people to buy a plate designed by African artists from Ayoka-Deco and have it in their homes all over the world."

Music
Image: Nabsolute Media

Reekado Banks Recalls The Carnage of The #EndSARS Protests In Single 'Ozumba Mbadiwe'

The Nigerian singer pays his respects to those lost during last year's #EndSARS protests.

Nigerian singer and songwriter Reekado Banks is back with a track that is as socially important as it is a banger. It seems fitting for the singer's first solo release of the year to be a tribute to his fellow countrypeople fighting for a country that they all wish to live in. The 27-year-old Afrobeats crooner has returned with endearing track 'Ozumba Mbadiwe', honoring the one-year anniversary of the #EndSARS protests that saw the Nigerian government authorize an onslaught of attacks on Nigerian citizens for their anti-government demonstrations.

The protests took the world by storm, additionally because the Nigerian government insists that none of the police brutality happened. In an attempt to gaslight the globe, Nigerian officials have come out to hoards to deny any and all accusations of unlawfully killing peaceful protesters. Banks mentions the absurd denials in the track, singing "October 20, 2020 something happened with the government, they think say we forget," in the second verse. Reekado's reflective lyrics blend smoothly and are supported by the upbeat, effortless Afrobeat rhythm.

In another reflective shoutout to his home, 'Ozumba Mbadiwe' is named after a popular expressway on Lagos Island that leads to the infamous Lekki Toll Gate where protesters were shot at, traumatized, and murdered. Although packed with conscious references, the P.Priime produced track is a perfect amalgamation of the talents that Reekado Banks has to offer; a wispy opening verse, a hook to kill, and an ethereal aura to mark this as a song as a hit. On "Ozumba Mbadiwe," all the elements align for Reekado's signature unsinkable sound to take flight.

Check out Reekado Bank's lyric video for his single 'Ozumba Mbadiwe'

Reekado Banks - Ozumba Mbadiwe (Lyric Video) www.youtube.com

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