Video
Nelson Freitas in "Goofy." Image courtesy of the artist.

Boddhi Satva & Nelson Freitas' 'Goofy' Video Will Transport You to the Dance Floor

Video Premiere: Central African Republic and Cape Verde connect for this highly-addictive and undulating production.

Boddhi Satva and Nelson Freitas come through with the new music video for "Goofy," a highlight from Freitas' latest album, Sempre Verão.

The track sees the Central African Republic producer, known for his 'Ancestral Soul' house style, connecting with the Cape Verdean singer for a highly-addictive and undulating production that will transport you to the dance floor.

The new music video for "Goofy," which we're premiering here today, was directed by the Lisbon-based duo Rafael Duarte and Iuri Policarpo was as shot at city spot Ferroviario. The striking dances were choreographed by Gigi and Sango, two figures in Portugal's afrobeats and Kizomba scene, with styling consultant Tekilla.

"When Boddhi played 'Goofy' for me, I loved the beat right away," Nelson Freitas tells OkayAfrica. "It's on some modern Kizomba/Afro-fusion. The whole process of the collaboration was really organic and we really worked hand-in-hand from the recording of the song to the video... It's definitely a nice summer track that will last the taste of time."

"Initially, we wanted to get Ty Dolla $ign on the record together with Nelson," Boddhi Satva explains, "but as usual, too many middlemen mess up the possibility for artists to connect and create. We then said to ourselves that it was a sign for us to just focus on Nelson rocking the song solo."

"The song is a serious piece that might lead people to make some babies (don't do it if you aren't sure and always wear protection) or spend their money on sushi in Miami... We hope you enjoy and spread the good vibe," Boddhi adds.

Watch the new music video for "Goofy" below.


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Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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