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#JusticeForGiovani, Cape Verde Demands Answers in the 'Barbaric' Death of 21-Year-Old Student In Portugal

Luis Giovani dos Santos Rodrigues, a Cape Verdean student living in Portugal, died on New Year's Eve after succumbing to injuries from an attack ten days earlier, which many believe was racially motivated.

Cape Verdeans are demanding answers in the "barbaric killing" of 21-year-old student and musician Luis Giovani dos Santos Rodrigues in Portugal last month.

According to various Portuguese reports, Rodrigues was allegedly attacked by a group of men while leaving a party at a local bar on December 21. According to the Portuguese newspaper Contacto, witnesses say a group of about 15 men approached Rodrigues and two of his friends armed with belts, sticks and other weapons. The report goes on to say that Rodrigues was beaten and left unconscious with bruises to his head. He spent 10 days in the hospital before succumbing to his injuries on December 31.


Rodrigues had moved to the town of Bragança less than two months earlier to attend the Bragança Polytechnic Institute (IPB), where he was studying Digital Game Design, according to a statement from the municipality of Mosteiros, where he was from. He was also known as a talented musician, who played piano at his childhood church in the Cape Verdean Island of Fogo.

He was a member of the band Beatz Boys, and was described as one of the "most promising artists in Mosteiros."

Jovem estudante mosteirense de 21 anos morre em Portugal vítima de espancamento www.youtube.com

According to Time 24 News, The Cape Verdean Embassy in Portugal has called for an autopsy and a full investigation into the circumstances surrounding Rodrigues' death. Cape Verde's President Jorge Carlos Fonseca, has also stated his involvement in seeking answers around Rodrigues' "brutal death."

Janira Hopffer Almada, the president of the opposition African Party for the Independence of Cape Verde, shared a post on Facebook calling for justice in Rodrigues' case and urging citizens to take up the cause of fellow Cape Verdeans living in Portugal. "It's time to stop and analyze the real situation of students and our community in Portugal," she wrote. "We have a duty to be more present."

Star Cape Verdean musical artist Nelson Freitas weighed in as well, sharing an image of Rodrigues by the artist Gualter Monteiro on his Instagram with the caption "We want justice!"

Artwork by Gualter Monteiro

"We deeply regret the barbarous assault that resulted in the death of a Cape Verdean student in Bragança," said the Portuguese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Augusto Santos Silva, "Those responsible will be identified and brought to justice."

Many online believe that racial discrimination in Portugal played a role in Rodrigues death, and some have stated that the incident should be investigated as a possible hate crime.

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Photo by Abena Boamah.

Photos: Here's What Happened at Daily Paper & Free the Youth's Design Talk for Accra's Young Creatives

Founders of the popular brands discussed all things African streetwear in a conversation facilitated by OkayAfrica and moderator Amarachi Nwosu.

Last week, Amsterdam-based, African-owned streetwear brand Daily Paper and Ghanaian streetwear label Free the Youth held a talk for young creatives at the Mhoseenu design studio in Accra, Ghana.

Moderated by Melanin Unscripted creator Amarachi Nwosu and presented in partnership with OkayAfrica, the design-based conversation explored everything from sustainable practices in manufacturing, to the overall evolution of streetwear globally. The founders of Free the Youth, which was been called Ghana's number one streetwear brand, expanded on how they've been able to build their audience, and shared details about their community-based initiatives.

They event, which took place at the Daily Paper Pop-up Store in Accra last Friday, drew a fashionable and creative-minded crowd ready to partake in a design discussion between West Africa and Europe.

Check out some of the action that took place at the Daily Paper x FYT event below, with photos by Abena Boamah.

Find more upcoming OkayAfrica events here.

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Photo by Fifo Adebakin.

Photos: This Is What the Melanin Unscripted x Native House Pop-Up Looked Like

Young African creatives gathered in community to discuss the state of contemporary African culture and music today.

As Lagos and Accra continue to buzz with plenty of concerts and parties to revel in the festive season as well as ring in the new year, young African creatives are also taking the time to gather like minds in community.

Melanin Unscripted, the agency and media platform headed by Nigerian-American visual multi-hyphenate Amarachi Nwosu, recently linked with The NATIVE to host Native House. Guests from near and far came through to the African Artists Foundation in Lagos for a day-long pop-up of cultural activations including a photo exhibition and a series of panels to discuss the state of contemporary African culture and music today.

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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