Arts + Culture

NextGen: Judie Mozie's Journey As an Emerging Artist Is an Example of Fearless Individuality

For Nigerian visual artist and director Judie Mozie, she wants to encourage Africans to embrace and celebrate all facets of their identities.

DIASPORAOver the course of July we'll be publishing short profiles, essays and interviews on the theme of "Afrofutures." Together these stories will be a deep dive into the way African and diaspora thinkers, technologists and artists view a future for Africans in the world and outside of it. 


Take a look at our introduction to Afrofuturism here.

Throughout this month, we'll also highlight and celebrate young, leading talents who already put into practice what a future with black people look like through their work in our daily profile series, 'NextGen.'

In our seventh edition, we catch up with Nigerian artist and director, Judie Mozie. 

With little representation of black people in fine art, Judie Mozie is aligning her own path and shaping a new narrative for African artists. Mozie is a Nigerian visual artist and director currently living in Los Angeles, California. Although she's a contemporary artist focused on creating her own lane, she has also worked with major companies like Complex, The Shade Room and Jason of Beverly Hills. Mozie has also been apart of art exhibitions in LA and even personalized clothing pieces for artists like Wizkid.

Photo courtesy of Judie Mozie.

Mozie has always been captivated by the diverse and unique varieties of the human experience and was raised to celebrate diversity with all of its infinite facets. Her art takes inspiration from a number of disciplines and is highly influenced by her Nigerian heritage. Originally disciplined in film directing, Judie uses her visual senses as a way to elevate her message. She curates the platform Cosmic Shades of Brown that features all her artwork and allows people to interact with the African artists that have inspired her along the way. She believes that it is the story of the artist that truly energizes their work.

"To me it is a way for black people to redefine their history, their present, and future," she says when speak on Afrofuturism. "It is a way for people of African descent to envision the future based off of their experiences and history.”

Photo courtesy of Judie Mozie.

She continued with the role she wants to play in the movement adding, “I want to help shape the narratives of African people by living my truth as openly and boldly as possible. I feel like it's important to show that there are so many ways to be African and that the only person, who can define you as a person, is yourself. I want to help remove the fear of individuality and encourage Africans to embrace and celebrate all facets of their identities.”

Mozie is currently working on her first solo exhibition opening August 6, 2017 that captures themes of family, strength, inner peace, and love.

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(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Ethic's Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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