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Louis Philippe de Gagoue. Photo courtesy of the artist.

NextGen: Louis Philippe de Gagoue Is the Dynamic Photographer Who Thrives Off of Spontaneity

Meet the Cameroonian-Ivorian photographer who's creating forward thinking editorials on his own terms.

This week, we'll be publishing short profiles, essays and interviews on the theme of "Afrofutures". Together these stories will be a deep dive into the way African and diaspora thinkers, technologists and artists view a future for Africans in the world and outside of it.

Take a look at our introduction to Afrofuturism here, with the second edition of the conversation here.

We'll highlight and celebrate young, leading talents who already put into practice what a future with black people look like through their work in the return of our profile series, 'NextGen.'

Cameroonian-Ivorian photographer, stylist and art director, Louis Philippe de Gagoue, has an eye whose work has landed him in Vogues across the world, France's L'Officiel, Elle, Nylon, Dubai's Brownbook and Germany's Blonde.

For de Gagoue, fashion has no borders. His portfolio is a unique blend of his African heritage alongside the Western and Far Eastern worlds. He's often described as vibrant, quirky and cool. His aesthetic is unbounded; it's home to culturally loaded settings, androgyny, jarring colors and compositions. We, the viewers, are transported to his imagination—his work offers a sort of escapism.

Though signed to Paris's notable Artsphere agency, he bounces from France to Cameroon to Ivory Coast to Morocco and celebrates not having citizenship to a Western country, for when he is famous, "No one will be able to disassociate him from the African continent."


Photo by Louis Philippe de Gagoue, courtesy of the artist.

It's important to note the trajectory of this multi-hyphenate's career. Louis Philippe studied law and made the transition to fashion 7 years ago. He didn't pick up a camera until 2016 and we're grateful because his gift is incontestable. He landed his first Vogue cover in February of 2017, 7 months after he switched gears to photography. He assertively describes the aforementioned as, "rare and unheard of."

When you're with de Gagoue, you have the ability to effortlessly draw inspiration from humans, travel, history and culture. He speaks candidly and unapologetically about the fact that he's not following anyone on social media because he wants to discover things on his own. His shoots are comprised of creating mood boards and spontaneously mixing looks on set. Nothing is premeditated. "It's all about the feel, the taste, nature, animals, experimenting and making mistakes," he says.

He continues:

"When you are in fashion, people think you are dumb. Do you really think Karl Lagerfeld is dumb? To be an artist, you have to know the industry and its history. Fashion is a lifestyle. We live for beauty in this industry."

For the artist, diversity is of the utmost importance. de Gagoue seeks out models of all sorts but in black women, he is particularly drawn to strong features, attitude and what would be deemed unconventional beauty.

Photo by Louis Philippe de Gagoue, courtesy of the artist.

"Afro" is a term he rejects, even more so, "Afrofuturism." He says it implies a traditional mindset that he refers to as "reductive."

"It's too trendy," de Gagoue declares. He refutes the aforementioned because when his white counterparts shoot black or African people, they aren't boxed in the same way he is. Despite the aforementioned, he empowers us. "I want to show that Africa is not what people think. I play with stereotypes and show we can find beauty in everything," he affirms. "The continent is beautiful from its architecture; to its women. We shouldn't wait for anyone to help us. The future is being true to who you are and where you are coming from."

He is possessed by an admirable confidence. We jokingly discuss the headpieces he has dawned for 2.5 years. He refers to them as his, "art signature" and states people in the industry hipped him to the fact that Gucci used his trademark in a recent show and collection.

With brands like Chanel, Prada, Versace, Edun, Loza Maléombho and an upcoming 10-page spread in Russian Vogue under his belt, Louis Philippe de Gagoue displays there is no holding him back.

Audrey Lang is an alumna of Northeastern University and a Boston-based site merchandiser. A surveyor of life who's enamored with all things fashion, art and Africa, keep up with her on Instagram and Tumblr.

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ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images.

Celebrated Coupé-Décalé Pioneer DJ Arafat Has Died from a Motorcycle Accident

The continent and the world has lost a true force who put the sounds of Côte d'Ivoire on the map.

DJ Arafat—a beacon of Côte d'Ivoire's coupé-décalé sound—tragically succumbed to his injuries from a motorcycle accident Monday morning, BBC Afrique reports.

Ivorian Public Radio-Television (RTI) says Maurice Bandaman, Ivorian Minister of Culture, confirmed his death, saying DJ Arafat, born Ange Didier Houon, collided into a car driven by a journalist from Radio Côte d'Ivoire Sunday night. He was not wearing a helmet.

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OkayAfrica Presents: 'The Adinkra Oracle' with Simone Bresi-Ando

We will be getting our lives with the help of our ancestors in this new monthly series featuring Simone Bresi-Ando's Adinkra Ancestral Guidance Cards.

OkayAfrica is proud to introduce The Adinkra Oracle—a new monthly series that's our answer to the horoscope craze that's taken over the internet.

As astrology enthusiasts consult the stars for guidance, why not consult our ancestors?

Simone Bresi-Ando is a Ghanaian-British PR expert, social commentator and activist who developed Bresi-Ando Tools For Living—a lifestyle hub providing 'tools for life' to help one get through the ups and downs utilizing what we already have, to manifest what we want.

One of her tools you'll be getting to know through this series is the Adinkra Ancestral Guidance Cards—a deck comprised of 44 Adinkra symbols to help you channel information, messages and direction from your ancestors using Adinkra symbols. As many may know, the Adinkra is an ancient language linked with the Akan people of Ghana and the Gyaman people of Ivory Coast.

Starting in August, Simone will give us an oracle reading from her codified cards and share what we need to hone into and keep in mind to have a fruitful month.

Watch below.

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Photo by Christian Petersen/Zuffa LLC.

Cameroonian UFC Fighter Francis Ngannou Is Set To Join the 9th 'Fast & Furious' Installment

"The Predator" will be the third UFC fighter to make an appearance in the blockbuster franchise.

This Cameroonian UFC fighter will be making his first movie appearance in the next installment of Fast & Furious, Deadline reports.

Francis Ngannou will be playing a character that has yet to be announced in the ninth Fast & Furious movie—the third UFC fighter to join the blockbuster franchise. The film is set to be released May 22, 2020.

Known in the ring as "The Predator," he currently ranks second in the heavyweight division, Deadline adds.

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Listen to Swae Lee & Drake's​ New Single 'Won't Be Late,' Produced by Tekno

As well as production, Tekno also gets a writing credit on the new song.

Rae Sremmurd's Swae Lee drops two new singles today, "Won't Be Late" featuring Drake and "Sextasy."

"Won't Be Late" is notably produced by Nigeria's own Tekno. The new single is built on a mid tempo, afro-fusion-inspired beat, filled with claps, and light keyboard chords.

As well as production, Tekno also gets a writing credit on the new song. You can hear his input when Drake sings lines like, 'Ikebe, pressing on me heavy' and 'Bakasi, moving on me wassy.'

If you remember, Drake shouted out Tekno last year as one of his many inspirations behind Scorpion and posted a picture of them working on something together.

"Won't Be Late" is paired with Swae Lee's "Sextasy" which was produced by Mike WiLL Made-It and Chopsquad DJ.

Tekno's had a lively past few months. He was recently featured in Beyoncé's The Lion King: The Gift album and dropped his "Agege" collaboration with Zlatan. He was also accused of being a "threat to security" by Nigeria's Council for Arts & Culture for that single's pole dancing video.

Listen to "Won't Be Late" below.

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