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Remi & Sampa The Great Made Your Summer Breakup Jam

Remi and Sampa The Great, two African-rooted artists making big waves in their home of Australia, connect on "For Good."


Remi and Sampa The Great are two African-rooted artists making big waves in the Australian music scene. The pair connect on the soulful single “For Good,” a track that looks at the demise of a relationship from both partners’ perspectives.

Nigerian-Australian Remi plays the absent boyfriend while Zambian-Motswana MC, poet & singer Sampa takes on the role of the fed up girl. The song’s new music video, directed by James Ruse, similarly follows a guy who messes up his relationship by living in the night too much and ignoring his girl.

“The inspiration behind the song is mad basic,” Remi tells Okayafrica. “I was a scandalous prick, and I wanted to outline how it went down and how it affected everyone involved. The best way to do this was to have both the male and female perspective.”

“We met Sampa [and] we were blown away by her raw skill and presence,” Remi mentions. “We became family from there, she came through the studio one Sunday arvo, we played her 'For Good' and she immediately vibed out then killed it. The whole joint was super organic and real fun too make. Our favourite way to get down.”

“For Good,” which also features Hiatus Kaiyote’s Simon Mavin on keyboards, will be on Remi and frequent collaborator Sensible J’s upcoming album Divas and Demons.

Check out the music video below.

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Photo by Barun Chatterjee.

Listen to Sampa the Great's Electrifying Debut Album 'The Return'

The Zambian artist makes a bold artistic statement with her much-anticipated debut album.

Sampa the Great has been on the grind for some time now, dropping several impressive hits and working with the likes of Ibeyi Kendrick Lamar and more. Now the Zambian artist shares her debut album The Return.

The artist gave a taste of the genre-bending elements of her debut album, when she released the funk-inspired single "Final Form" in June. The 19-track album boasts features from a range of artists including Krown, Ecca Vandal, thando and more.

"Today I release a piece of my heart to the world. The Return is a journey. Prepare your heart that journey," wrote the artist on Twitter.

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Photo by Barun Chatterjee.

Sampa The Great Returns With Stunning New Song and Video 'Final Form'

PREMIERE: Zambian artist Sampa The Great shares a soulful new banger.

Sampa The Great is back with her first single of the year, the hard-hitting "Final Form."

On "Final Form" the artist rhymes fiercely over grand production, offering soulful '70s funk vibes and a message of black power. "Great state I'm in, in all states I'm in, I might final form in my melanin," she declares confidently on the song's chorus.

The vibrant music video was shot in Zambia and Botswana, where Sampa was born and raised, respectively. The striking visual features dancers performing on the street and in the market and tons of colorful ambiance. Sampa serves up a number of bold looks as she performs the song in multiple settings throughout the two countries.

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Photo by Hamish Brown

In Conversation: Lemn Sissay On His New Book About Re-claiming the Ethiopian Heritage Stolen From Him by England’s Foster Care System

In 'My Name Is Why,' the 2019 PEN Pinter award winner passionately advocates for children in the institutional care system, and in turn tells a unique story of identity and the power in discovering one's heritage.

It took the author Lemn Sissay almost two decades to learn his real name. As an Ethiopian child growing up in England's care system, his cultural identity was systematically stripped from him at an early age. "For the first 18 years of my life I thought that my name was Norman," Sissay tells OkayAfrica. "I didn't meet a person of color until I was 10 years of age. I didn't know a person of color until I was 16. I didn't know I was Ethiopian until I was 16 years of age. They stole the memory of me from me. That is a land grab, you know? That is post-colonial, hallucinatory madness."

Sissay was not alone in this experience. As he notes in his powerful new memoir My Name Is Why, during the 1960s, tens of thousands of children in the UK were taken from their parents under dubious circumstances and put up for adoption. Sometimes, these placements were a matter of need, but other times, as was the case with Sissay, it was a result of the system preying on vulnerable parents. His case records, which he obtained in 2015 after a hardfought 30 year campaign, show that his mother was a victim of child "harvesting," in which young, single women were often forced into giving their children up for adoption before being sent back to their native countries. She tried to regain custody of young Sissay, but was unsuccessful.

Whether they end up in the foster system out of need or by mistake, Sissay says that most institutionalized children face the same fate of abuse under an inadequate and mismanaged system that fails to recognize their full humanity. For black children who are sent to white homes, it often means detachment from a culturally-sensitive environment. "There are too many brilliant people that I know who have been adopted by white parents for me to say that it just doesn't work," says Sissay. "But the problem is the amount of children that it doesn't work for."

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(Screenshot from "Every Woman" video)

Check out Cameroonian Crooner Vagabon’s New Ode to Female Power

The singer dropped a video for new single "Every Woman" today, shot by fellow Cameroonian director Lino Asana.

Cameroonian-born singer-songwriter Laetitia Tamko, better known as her stage name Vagabon, has been spoiling us with delights as of late. First, the crooner teased us with two singles, "Flood" and "Water Me Down" from her forthcoming sophomore album, Vagabon, a work she wrote and produced herself. And today, she surprised us with a new single and video for "Every Woman"—a track Tamko claims is the "thesis of the album," as per a press statement reported by The Fader magazine

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