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Rwanda Is Using Robots to Screen COVID-19 Patients

The five new robots have the ability "to screen 50 to 150 people per minute," says the Health Ministry.

Rwanda will be using robots to aid in the fight against COVID-19, the country's Health Ministry announced the development on Wednesday.

Five anti-epidemic robots, which were each given Rwandan names: Akazuba, Ikirezi, Mwiza, Ngabo, and Urumuri, have been equipped with screening capabilities, and will help administer temperature checks, monitor patient status, and keep medical records.

According to tweets from the Ministry of Health's page, the robots have the ability "to screen 50 to 150 people per minute, deliver food and medication to patient rooms, capture data and notify officers on duty about detected abnormalities."


Health Minister Daniel Ngamije told BBC Africa, that the country is working on getting more robots that can perform other tasks such as disinfecting public spaces.

The robots are manufactured by a Belgium-based company and also have the capability to alert health workers of abnormalities and warn people who aren't wearing marks, or are wearing them improperly, reports BBC Africa.

Rwanda is the country considered to be at the forefront of technological advancement on the continent, and this has apparently extended to the public health realm during the pandemic. "The infectious nature of COVID-19 calls for technological innovations to tackle the pandemic. This is why Rwanda has introduced robots and drones among other high-tech initiatives to enhance efficiency in the fight," ICT and Innovation Minister Paula Ingabire is quoted as saying.

To date, Rwanda has recorded just under 300 cases with 203 recoveries and zero deaths according to official reports.

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Photo by Deon Raath/Rapport/Gallo Images via Getty Images

Spirit Of Humanity Gives Hope To Young Boy Mauled By A Hyena

A 9-year-old Zimbabwean boy Rodwell Nkomazana has a shot at a normal life, again, after a horrific hyena attack left him with half of his face missing.

It takes a village to raise a child and sometimes that village comes from thousands of kilometers away, and consists of committed surgeons, passionate nurses and generous international donors. Nine-year-old Rodwell Nkomazana was asleep at an all-night church service when the unthinkable happened. The little boy was attacked and mauled by a hyena outside Harare, in Zimbabwe.

The medical team at Parirenyatwa Hospital in Harare, where he received his initial treatment, did all they could to save his life and stabilise him. However, due to a lack of resources and expertise, it was all they could do.

With half of his face missing, including an eye, his upper lip, his nose and part of his forehead, Rodwell was set for a life full of challenges. Not only would he have lost his childhood, but he would have probably spent most of his time in seclusion — isolated from the rest of society.

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Photo by -/AFP via Getty Images.

Africa Could Start Producing COVID-19 Vaccines In 9 Months

While Western countries are speeding ahead with their vaccination programmes, Africa and the rest of the global South are still lagging far behind. Not for too long if all goes well according to the World Health Organisation!

At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic it seemed as though the entire world was navigating the same rough seas. Now, however, it appears that some countries are cruising in mega yachts, while poorer countries are paddling in leaking kayaks.

If all goes according to plan, things are about to change. The World Health Organisation (WHO) recently announced that it will be setting up a technology transfer hub for producing mRNA, the latest vaccine technology currently used in Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. This technology transfer hub could see a number of vaccines manufactured between 9 and 12 months.

With the rest of the world moving fast with its vaccination programmes, COVID-19 threatens to become a third world disease. Currently, the continent is experiencing a devastating third wave which threatens the lives and wellbeing of millions of people. As it stands, a mere 1 percent of the continent's population has been vaccinated.

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Ugandan Sports Maven Usher Komugisha Is Preparing To Spread Her Wings

After successfully commentating at the recent Basketball Africa League held in Kigali, award-winning sports journalist and analyst Usher Komughisha is dead set on pursuing a new challenge.

Most times, when we think of sports industry personalities, especially in Africa, the first name that springs to mind is usually that of a male. Women, however, are increasingly breaking barriers and taking up their rightful positions everywhere in society. And it's so inspiring to watch!


Usher Komugisha continues to defy the odds, and she is rising to become a household name in the sports industry in Africa. If you followed the inaugural Basketball Africa League (BAL) competition that kicked off on May 16, 2021 in Kigali, Rwanda, then you definitely know who we are talking about. With great power, control and a unique voice, Usher commanded the attention of basketball lovers in the 215 countries it was broadcasted to.

Usher's bubbly personality, which shone through when I first contacted her telephonically, brought warmth, a sense of comfort and for a minute it felt like we'd been friends for eternity. Below, she fills us in on her sports career and (near) future plans...

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