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Sho Madjozi Shares Visuals for ‘Kona’ to Celebrate the One-Year Anniversary of her Debut Album

Watch Sho Madjozi's music video for 'Kona.'

South African rapper Sho Madjozi's debut album Limpopo Champions League turns one today. And the artist treated her fans to new visuals for the song "Kona" from the project.


The song leans towards Shangaan electro, and the artist gives it a fitting visual which showcases the famous xibelani dance and outfits.

The visuals were filmed both in Sho Madjozi's village in Limpopo and Los Angeles. In the video, the artist implies that she broke down barriers. In the opening scene, she is told by a group of people that she won't succeed in Joburg wearing her traditional attire and speaking her language XiTsonga. Instead, she makes it Hollywood, as the scenes that follow were shot there.

Sho Madjozi recently recounted a few of the album's accolades in an Instagram post. "Limpopo Champions League turns one today (14th December 2019)," she said. "This album has produced 1 platinum single ('Huku'), one gold single ('Wakanda'), two SAMAs and one BET Award. It has put me on stages around the globe and got me on the covers Elle, Cosmopolitan, Bona etc. Happy birthday #LimpopoChampionsLeague."

Limpopo Champions League, which the artist released independently, showcased Sho Madjozi's wide taste and versatility as musician. The album had hip-hop, gqom and shangaan electro songs. It featured the likes of Kwesta, Makwa, pH Raw X, Makhadiz among others.

Sho Madjozi has achieved unthinkable success since the release of Limpopo Champions League. After appearing on A COLORS SHOW to perform her single "John Cena," she found herself meeting the man himself. More about that here. Sho Madjozi recently appeared on the infamous and forever controversial annual MTV Base Hottest MC List.

Watch the music video for "Kona" below and revisit Limpopo Champions League underneath.

Sho Madjozi - Kona (Official Music Video) youtu.be


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