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Stromae Announces African Tour Dates

Belgian-Rwandan pop artist Stromae has announced an 8-date African tour across Senegal, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, DRC, and more.


Belgian-born, Rwandan-rooted pop singer Stromae has announced that he'll be touring across Sub-Saharan Africa in May for his eight-date Tournée Africaine. Stromae's African tour dates will see him playing shows in Senegal, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, the Republic of Congo, DRC, Gabon, and Rwanda, the birthplace of his father. The concerts will take place in the middle of the pop artist's extensive European and North American tour (he just brought out Kanye West last night at his Coachella set). Revisit Stromae's recent social media addiction video for "Carmen" below and, for more, check out his Cesária Évora tribute video “Ave Cesaria”, Belgian world cup anthem “Ta Fête” and the second capsule collection of his clothing line MOSAERT. View Stromae's full African, European and North American tour dates listed underneath.

Update 6/16: Stromae has been forced to cancel concerts in Kinshasa and Kigali due to a "serious side effects from preventative anti-malaria treatment, which has necessitated immediate hospitalization and require medical supervision," a statement from the artist's camp reads. Additional cancelled tour dates include shows in the UK, Italy, Portugal, Switzerland, Spain and the United States. See below for his updated tour dates.

Stromae North American & European Tour Dates

Apr 22 stade Renée Serge Nabajoth des Abymes Pointe A Pitre, Guadeloupe

Jul 05 Wireless Festival London, United Kingdom

Jul 08 Postepay Rock Roma, Italy

Jul 11 NOS Alive Festival Lisbon, Portugal

Jul 13 Moon & Stars Festival Locarno, Switzerland

Jul 14 Hydrogen Festival Padova, Italy

Jul 17 Benicassim Festival Benicasim, Spain

Jul 31 Lollapalooza Chicago 2015 Chicago, IL

Aug 02 Grant Park Chicago, IL

Sep 12 James L. Knight Center Miami, FL

Sep 14 The Buckhead Theater Atlanta, GA

Sep 16 Echostage Washington, DC

Sep 17 The Electric Factory Philadelphia, PA

Sep 18 House of Blues Boston, MA

Sep 22 Myth Minneapolis, MN

Sep 25 Royal Oak Music Theater Detroit, MI

Sep 26 Echo Beach Toronto, Canada

Sep 29 Bell Centre Montreal, Canada

Oct 01 Madison Square Garden New York, NY

Interview
Photo: Jolaoso Adebayo.

Crayon Is Nigeria's Prince of Bright Pop Melodies

Since emerging on the scene over two years ago, Crayon has carved a unique path with his catchy songs.

During the 2010s, the young musician Charles Chibuezechukwu made several failed attempts to get into a Nigerian university. On the day of his fifth attempt, while waiting for the exam's commencement, he thought of what he really wanted out of life. To the surprise of the thousands present, he stood up and left the centre, having chosen music. "Nobody knew I didn't write the exam," Charles, who's now known to afro pop lovers as Crayon, tells OkayAfrica over a Zoom call from a Lagos studio. "I had to lie to my parents that I wrote it and didn't pass. But before then, I had already met Don Jazzy and Baby Fresh [my label superiors], so I knew I was headed somewhere."

His assessment is spot on. Over the past two years Crayon's high-powered records have earned him a unique space within Nigeria's pop market. On his 2019 debut EP, the cheekily-titled Cray Cray, the musician shines over cohesive, bright production where he revels in finding pockets of joy in seemingly everyday material. His breakout record "So Fine" is built around the adorable promises of a lover to his woman. It's a fairly trite theme, but the 21-year-old musician's endearing voice strikes the beat in perfect form, and when the hook "call my number, I go respond, oh eh" rolls in, the mastery of space and time is at a level usually attributed to the icons of Afropop: Wizkid, P-Square, Wande Coal.

"My dad used to sell CDs back in the day, in Victoria Island [in Lagos]," reveals Crayon. "I had access to a lot of music: afrobeat, hip-hop, Westlife, 2Face Idibia, Wizkid, and many others." Crayon also learnt stage craft from his father's side hustle as an MC, who was always "so bold and confident," even in the midst of so much activity. His mother, then a fruit seller, loved Igbo gospel songs; few mornings passed when loud, worship songs weren't blasting from their home. All of these, Crayon says, "are a mix of different sounds and different cultures that shaped my artistry."

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