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Sudanese Protesters Continue Civil Disobedience Campaign as Death Toll Rises to 118

Opposition groups have encouraged protesters to not go to work as a call for a civil state in Sudan.

Sudanese protesters continue to fight for civil rule by enacting a civil disobedience campaign Sunday, The New York Times reports.

Dissenters have been encouraged to not go to work as a call for a civil state. Khartoum and other major cities have been at a standstill with deserted streets and closed shops. Security forces are reported to have killed four more protesters, raising to death toll to 118 following the violent crackdown by the Rapid Support Forces last week, CNN adds.


The Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA), say in a statement that the campaign will end when the ruling generals "transfer power to a civil transitional authority in accordance with the Declaration of Freedom and Change."

The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors say eight hospitals have been completely shut down by the military, making it close to impossible to treat the injured. The SPA had called for medical professionals to be exempted from the strikes in lieu of the shutdown.

Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan, aka Hemeti, is the leader of the Rapid Support Forces despite the paramilitary group's former leader being Lt. Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Burhan. Hemeti is essentially the center of the terror brought upon the protesters, as his iron fist is the main legacy of the al-Bashir era, activist Reem Abbas tells CNN in a video interview.

"This is the legacy of his era—militias that are uncontrollable, using the same tactics they've used in Darfur and [in] other parts of Sudan," Abbas adds. "People are still hopeful—they still feel they have not defeated. They have been protesting even though the RSF militias are roaming the streets.

As protesters endure an internet blackout on the ground, Sudanese organizers in the diaspora continue to raise awareness. A community-based action meeting is due to be held at The Africa Center in Harlem Monday, "to inform, support and heal in light of the recent events in Sudan." Click here for more information.

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Sudan Now has its First Ever Women's Soccer League

The league comprises 21 clubs and plans are in the works to produce an official national team.

Yesterday, Sudan's much anticipated women's soccer league finally kicked off and saw two teams going against each other at the Khartoum Stadium. Sudan's new Minister of Sport Wala Essam and a number of foreign diplomats attended the match amid a vibrant crowd. The establishing of the league comes after the country has recently entered into a coalition government between the military and civilians. The coalition government, under the leadership of the newly elected Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok, will govern Sudan during a three-year transitional period that will eventually cede power over to civilians.

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Watch the Music Video for Bas' Single 'Jollof Rice,' Featuring EarthGang

The infectious track gets an equally vibrant music video.

Paris-born, New York-raised, Sudanese rapper, Bas shares the music video for "Jollof Rice" a standout from his latest project Spilled Milk Volume 1, featuring Atlanta duo and fellow Dreamville members, EarthGang.

On the infectious song, produced by DZL the rappers spit boisterous lyrics and talk about their many desires: one of them being having their crush cook them jollof rice. Bas told Beats 1 Radio last month that the song and others on the project, were inspired by a recent trip he took to Lagos with label head, J. Cole.

READ: Bas: "I Was Born in France & Raised in New York But I'm Still African

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The music video, directed by Mariah Winter, is simple but striking as the three artists perform in a hazy and retro-inspired studio surrounded by several modelesque women—all of them dressed impeccably fun and stylishly.

The artist announced last month that he would be dropping a new full-length album this month, so we have that to look forward too as well.

Check out the music video for 'Jollof Rice" below.

Bas - Jollof Rice feat. EarthGang (Official Video) www.youtube.com

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Several People Have Been Killed During Protests in Guinea

Guineans are protesting against changes to the constitution which will allow President Alpha Conde to run for a third term.

At least five people have died during protests in Guinea's Conakry and Mamou after police opened fire on them, according to Aljazeera. The protests come just after President Alpha Conde instructed his government to look into drafting a new constitution that will allow him to remain in power past the permissible two terms. Conde's second five-year term will come to an end next year but as is the unfortunate case with many African leaders, the 81-year-old is intent on running for office yet again.

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Photo by Hamish Brown

In Conversation: Lemn Sissay On His New Book About Re-claiming the Ethiopian Heritage Stolen From Him by England’s Foster Care System

In 'My Name Is Why,' the 2019 PEN Pinter award winner passionately advocates for children in the institutional care system, and in turn tells a unique story of identity and the power in discovering one's heritage.

It took the author Lemn Sissay almost two decades to learn his real name. As an Ethiopian child growing up in England's care system, his cultural identity was systematically stripped from him at an early age. "For the first 18 years of my life I thought that my name was Norman," Sissay tells OkayAfrica. "I didn't meet a person of color until I was 10 years of age. I didn't know a person of color until I was 16. I didn't know I was Ethiopian until I was 16 years of age. They stole the memory of me from me. That is a land grab, you know? That is post-colonial, hallucinatory madness."

Sissay was not alone in this experience. As he notes in his powerful new memoir My Name Is Why, during the 1960s, tens of thousands of children in the UK were taken from their parents under dubious circumstances and put up for adoption. Sometimes, these placements were a matter of need, but other times, as was the case with Sissay, it was a result of the system preying on vulnerable parents. His case records, which he obtained in 2015 after a hardfought 30 year campaign, show that his mother was a victim of child "harvesting," in which young, single women were often forced into giving their children up for adoption before being sent back to their native countries. She tried to regain custody of young Sissay, but was unsuccessful.

Whether they end up in the foster system out of need or by mistake, Sissay says that most institutionalized children face the same fate of abuse under an inadequate and mismanaged system that fails to recognize their full humanity. For black children who are sent to white homes, it often means detachment from a culturally-sensitive environment. "There are too many brilliant people that I know who have been adopted by white parents for me to say that it just doesn't work," says Sissay. "But the problem is the amount of children that it doesn't work for."

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