News Brief
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Sudanese Protesters Continue Civil Disobedience Campaign as Death Toll Rises to 118

Opposition groups have encouraged protesters to not go to work as a call for a civil state in Sudan.

Sudanese protesters continue to fight for civil rule by enacting a civil disobedience campaign Sunday, The New York Times reports.

Dissenters have been encouraged to not go to work as a call for a civil state. Khartoum and other major cities have been at a standstill with deserted streets and closed shops. Security forces are reported to have killed four more protesters, raising to death toll to 118 following the violent crackdown by the Rapid Support Forces last week, CNN adds.


The Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA), say in a statement that the campaign will end when the ruling generals "transfer power to a civil transitional authority in accordance with the Declaration of Freedom and Change."

The Central Committee of Sudanese Doctors say eight hospitals have been completely shut down by the military, making it close to impossible to treat the injured. The SPA had called for medical professionals to be exempted from the strikes in lieu of the shutdown.

Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan, aka Hemeti, is the leader of the Rapid Support Forces despite the paramilitary group's former leader being Lt. Gen. Abdel Fattah al-Burhan. Hemeti is essentially the center of the terror brought upon the protesters, as his iron fist is the main legacy of the al-Bashir era, activist Reem Abbas tells CNN in a video interview.

"This is the legacy of his era—militias that are uncontrollable, using the same tactics they've used in Darfur and [in] other parts of Sudan," Abbas adds. "People are still hopeful—they still feel they have not defeated. They have been protesting even though the RSF militias are roaming the streets.

As protesters endure an internet blackout on the ground, Sudanese organizers in the diaspora continue to raise awareness. A community-based action meeting is due to be held at The Africa Center in Harlem Monday, "to inform, support and heal in light of the recent events in Sudan." Click here for more information.

Music
Photo courtesy of AYLØ.

Interview: AYLØ Bridges His Music & Universe In the 'Clairsentience' EP

The Nigerian artist talks about trusting your gut feelings, remedying imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do.

AYLØ's evolution as an artist has led him to view sensitivity as a gift. As the alté soundscape in the Nigerian scene gains significant traction, his laser focus cuts through the tempting smokescreen of commercial success. AYLØ doesn't make music out of need or habit. It all boils down to the power of feeling. "I know how I can inspire people when I make music, and how music inspires me. Now it's more about the message."

Clairsentience, the title of the Nigerian artist's latest EP, is simply defined as the ability to perceive things clearly. A clairsentient person perceives the world through their emotions. Contrary to popular belief, clairsentience isn't a paranormal sixth sense reserved for the chosen few, our inner child reveals that it's an innate faculty that lives within us before the world told us who to be.

Born in 1994 in Benin City, Nigeria, AYLØ knew he wanted to be a musician since he was six-years-old. Raised against the colorful backdrop of his dad's jazz records and the echoes of church choirs from his mother's vast gospel collections, making music isn't something anyone pushed him towards, it organically came to be. By revisiting his past to reconcile his promising future, he shares that, "Music is about your experiences. You have to live to write shit. Everything adds up to the music."

Our conversation emphasized the importance of trusting your gut feelings, how to remedy imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do,

This interview has been edited for purposes of brevity and clarity.

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