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Bas Announces New Album, Talks African Influences In His Music & More on Beats 1 Radio

In an interview on Apple Music's Beats 1 Radio, the artist reveals a new project dropping in September and discusses what he learned on a recent trip to Lagos with J.Cole.

Rapper and Dreamville signee Bas, just released his latest project Spilled Milk 1 last week, but he already has another project up his sleeves.

The artist took to Apple Music's Beats 1 Radio on Monday to speak with host Nadeska to talk about his latest album which features fellow Dreamville artists Ari Lennox, EARTHGANG, Nigerian artist Kiddominant and more. He also revealed that he'll be dropping another full length album next month.

READ: Bas: "I Was Born in France & Raised in New York But I'm Still African"Bas: "I Was Born in France & Raised in New York But I'm Still African"

The Paris-born, New York-raised rapper of Sudanese heritage also spoke about his 2018 trip to Nigeria with J. Cole, which was the inspiration for his song "Jollof Rice," and a way of paying homage to the continent and the culture (there's also a song on the project called "Fried Rice.")

Bas - Jollof Rice feat. EarthGang (Official Audio + Lyric Video) www.youtube.com

OkayAfrica spoke with the artist about his trip to Lagos last year, and he described an eye-opening performance: "The songs didn't have J. Cole featured on them but while performing, thousands of Lagos people were rapping with me word for word and I was like, what the hell is going on here," said Bas. "I was unaware, I didn't know my music was known that much. I was very surprised with all the love and support I was getting from people. It was very inspiring to show that there is so much room to make music because there is so much culture and energy there."

The artist also discusses working with fellow rappers Vince Staples, Smino and more. You can listen to Bas' full interview on Apple Music's Beats 1 Radio below.

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J. Cole's Lagos Performance and My Depression

After a suicide attempt, J. Cole became more than an artist to me. He was my life coach. One year later, he came to Nigeria.

"Why are you trying to kill yourself? What is so hard in the world that you want to end your life?"

I heard my rescuer asking as I sat on the waterfront, hot tears streaming down my face, mixing with the drops of water and ultimately dribbling into on my soaked clothes. I had tried to drown myself in Lagos that night in April 2017, and by some stroke of fortune, someone had dived right in to save my life.

At that moment, I wasn't grateful for the chance to see another day and breath the air. A part of me resented him for being a saviour, and not minding his business. Another part was filled with shame that I had let depression bring me to the edge of my humanity, and the final part was just bitterness from the pain. And so I sat on the floor and wept, while people gathered and gave me lots of advice and encouragement.

"Brother, there is so much to live for. And look at you, you are not poor. You are a fine young man," the voice of a lady hit me.

I returned to my office that night, and told my bosses that the resignation email I sent to them earlier was an error, withdrew it, and deleted all my parting letters to my friends and family. Not accomplishing a suicide felt like failure. I learned that day that rearranging the pieces of my existence back to how it was, was the morbid equivalent of a walk of shame. I did that walk of shame. On the drive back home in an Uber, I took the aux cord and played the first album that hit my mind.

It was J. Cole's 2014 Forest Hill Drive.

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