Film
Still from trailer.

Uzo Aduba Gives a Striking Performance In the Trailer for Upcoming Hip Hop Drama 'Beats'

The actress plays the mother of a reclusive hip hop prodigy in the upcoming Netflix film, also starring Anthony Anderson.

Emmy-winning actress, Uzo Aduba, has proved her acting chops yet again in the intense trailer for Netlfix's "Beats."

The coming-of-age film follows a teen from Chicago—played by newcomer Khalil Everage—who just so happens to be a hip hop prodigy who makes beats in his room. He's mostly withdrawn from the outside world however, until a school security guard, played by Black-ish's Anthony Anderson tries to get him out of his shell in order to share his musical gift with the world.

We see Aduba give a stoic performance as the young protagonist's protective mother.

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Photo Courtesy of Uzo Aduba

Uzo Aduba to Portray Shirley Chisholm In New FX Limited Television Series 'Mrs. America'

The Emmy-award winning actress will play the Civil Rights icon in an upcoming nine-part series about the Equal Rights Act.

Uzo Aduba is gearing up for a major role, as she's set to play the politician, author and first black woman to be elected to US Congress, Shirley Chisholm, in an upcoming limited series from FX, Shadow and Act reports.

The series, titled "Mrs America" will also star Cate Blanchett and will center on several American female figures and the fight to pass the Equal Rights Amendment, which proposed that civil rights not be determined on the basis of sex.

READ: 100 Women: Uzo Aduba Wants to Use Her Roles to Give a Voice to the Voiceless

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Photo Courtesy of Uzo Aduba

100 Women: Uzo Aduba Wants to Use Her Roles to Give a Voice to the Voiceless

We talk to the Emmy-winning standout of Orange is the New Black on how to be good, just as you are.

As a child Uzoamaka Aduba was insecure about a great many things. Her name and the now-famous gap in her teeth were among the number. "My mom would try to impress upon me constantly, 'Don't you know that in Nigeria, a gap is a sign of beauty? It's a sign of intelligence.' I'm like, 'We don't live in Nigeria, mom. We live in Medfield, Massachusetts.'" Thirty-seven-year-old Aduba is quite the opposite—dramatically, if you will. Currently chatting from a mountainside village in Mendoza, Argentina, she exudes total self-possession, and is crystal clear on not just her beauty and her talent, but on what she stands for ("Equality for all. Full stop.") and even her privilege.

"Whatever I think is hard is nowhere near what hard is. First solid lesson. Anything that I considered to be difficult, I don't have to reach that far back into my history and to my community stories to know what hard really looked like," the Nigerian-American actress states in a definitive tone. "Hard is moving to a country where you know no one and have five children. Hard is surviving a civil war. Hard is surviving polio. Hard is learning how to blend into a new culture without losing your own. You understand? Me figuring out which of the seven pairs of jeans I want to wear today is not hard."

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