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Tante Kata / Angelique, Dakar, c. 1961. Roger daSilva (C) 2018 The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation Courtesy Xaritufoto and Le Korsa

These Newly Discovered Photos From 1950s Senegal Capture the Good Times During an Era of Political Change

Unearthed photos by Roger DaSilva, which will be on display at the Also Known As Africa art and design fair in Paris this November, include rare images of presidents, jazz icons and everyday people in pre-independence Senegal.

A newly discovered collection from Senegalese photographer Roger DaSilva offers a rarefied glimpse into life in 1950s Senegal. DaSilva was born in Benin and took up photography after joining the French army in 1942. He returned to Dakar, considered his "adopted home" in 1947, where he began to capture the city's bustling social scenes. Instead of working within the confines of a studio in the tradition of fellow photographers Malick Sidibé and Samuel Fosso, DaSilva frequented "the city's night clubs and upscale weddings, he captured the vibrancy of youth culture in the post-war period and the African independence movements that were beginning to emerge."

The recently unearthed archive of over 100 of his images, which were restored by the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation will debut at AKAA (Also Known As Africa) art and design fair in Paris for the first time next month. It will mark the first time that the images are shown outside of Senegal.

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Photo (c) John Liebenberg

'Stolen Moments' Uncovers the Namibian Music That Apartheid Tried to Erase

The photo exhibition, showing at the Brunei Gallery in London, highlights artists from Namibia's underground scene between 1950-1980, a time of immense musical suppression prior to its independence.

Before its independence in 1990, a whole generation of Namibians were made to believe that their country had no real musical legacy. Popular productions by Namibian artists from previous eras were systematically concealed from the masses for nearly 30 years under the apartheid regime—which extended to the country from South Africa following German colonization—depriving many Namibians of the opportunity to connect with their own musical heritage.

"Stolen Moments: Namibian Music Untold," a new exhibit currently showing at London's Brunei Museum at SOAS University of London, seeks to revive Namibian musical traditions that the apartheid regime attempted to erase.

"Imagine you had never known about the musical riches of your country," said the exhibit's curator Aino Moongo in a statement of purpose on SOAS' site. "Your ears had been used to nothing but the dull sounds of the country's former occupants and the blaring church and propaganda songs that were sold to you as your country's musical legacy. Until all at once, a magnitude of unknown sounds, melodies and songs appear. This sound, that roots your culture to the musical influences of jazz, blues and pop from around the world, is unique, yet familiar. It revives memories of bygone days, recites the history of your homeland and enables you for the first time to experience the emotions, joys and pains of your ancestors."

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