Popular
Ilwad Elman (Photo by Earl Gibson III/Getty Images for BET)

These Two Young African Women Were Nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize

Ilwad Elman and Hajer Sharief have made the favored list for winning the prestigious award.

This year's nominations for the Nobel Peace Prize are out and among the names are Somalian social rights activist Ilwad Elman and Libyan law student Hajer Sharief. The Nobel Peace Prize, first awarded in 1901, is said to honor "the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between the nations and the abolition or reduction of standing armies and the formation and spreading of peace congresses" according to the Nobel Prize organization. What's even more impressive is that both women are on the short list of the Director for the Peace Research Institute Oslo–the list is thought to highlight the strongest contenders for the prize according to those who work in the field.

The two women, Elman, 29, and Sharief, 26, have been important catalysts for peacebuilding in their respective countries. Both are part of former UN Secretary General Kofi Annan's initiative Extremely Together, which brings together 10 young change makers from around the world, as well as have appointed positions from former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon.


Elman was born in Mogadishu to two parents who were peace activists in their own right, Fartuun Adan and Elman Ali Ahmed. With no signs of the war easing in the early 90's, Elman's mother left with her and her sisters, eventually receiving asylum in Canada some years later. Her father was assassinated for assisting in the rehabilitation of youth co-opted by war. In 2010, at 19, Elman decided to return to Mogadishu and do what she could to further messages of peace. Since then she has led many social programs, particularly those focused on women's rights in Somalia. Her many accomplishments include founding Somalia's first rape crisis center for survivors of sexual and gender-based violence.


Sharief has been active in fighting for peace in Libya since 2011 when she witnessed the horrific events of the civil war. Shook by what she saw, that same year Sharief, then 19, started her own organization aimed at supporting a peaceful democratic transition called Together We Build It. The organization focuses on empowering women and youth in Libyan society. In 2013, Sharief co-initiated the 1325 Network project, a collection of organizations and activists across 30 cities in Libya who can work together to raise awareness of women's role in building safe societies. She is currently studying law while.



Hajer Sharief Ryan Lash / TED


Other favored nominees for the prize include Nathan Law Kwun-chung, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, International Rescue Committee and the Control Arms Coalition. A full list of the 301 candidates can be found here. The award will be given on December 10 in Oslo, Norway.

Read: Prominent Somali Activist Almaas Elman Shot and Killed In Mogadishu

News Brief

Twitter Set to Build New Africa Headquarters in Ghana

According to Jack Dorsey, Twitter CEO and co-founder, their new Africa headquarters will be in Ghana — beating strong contenders such as South Africa, Kenya and Nigeria.

Jack Dorsey, Twitter CEO and co-founder, has reportedly announced that the social networking service will be basing its new Africa headquarters in Ghana. The announcement was shared, earlier today, on Twitter's own blog and via Dorsey's personal account. Ghana President Nana Akufo-Addo quickly confirmed the news, stating that Ghana welcomed the announcement and the confidence reflected by the giant social media company's choice of country.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Interview: Fally Ipupa Continues His Legacy With 'Tokooos II'

The iconic Congolese singer opens up about his latest album, vast influence and future plans.