News Brief

Three Major Figures from Sudan's Transitional Military Council Have Stepped Down

This is a victory for the people of Sudan who want the military to hand over power to civilians.

According to the BBC, three major lieutenants from the ruling Transitional Military Council have stepped down. Lieutenants Omar Zain al-Abideen, Jalal al-Deen al-Sheikh and Al-Tayeb Babakr Ali Fadeel, tendered their resignations after talks were held between the Transitional Military Council and protest leaders. The three figures are staunch Islamists whose loyalty is with the recently ousted President Omar al-Bashir.


Spokesperson for the military, Lieutenant-General Shamseddine Kabbashi, said earlier that a committee had been established between the military and the protest leaders in an effort to better understand and smooth over their differences.

One of the demands of the Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA), the group primarily behind the protests, were met after the resignation of the three military figures who were involved in the deadly crackdown that led to dozens of protesters being killed.

READ: Sudanese Military Leaders Attempt To Reassure Protesters After Rejecting 2-Year Military Takeover

However, Dr Sara Abdelgalil who is a member of the SPA said that they were planning a massive march that they hoped would comprise of approximately 1 million civilians. Abdelgalil said, "What we are hoping to do today is to continue our peaceful resistance...What we are hoping to do today is to continue our peaceful resistance."

Thousands of Sudanese civilians have been arriving in the capital city of Khartoum as they prepare to increase the pressure on the military so as to bring about democratic reform.

It is reported that al-Bashir is still being held in solitary confinement at the notorious Kobar prison in the capital city. Aside from the International Criminal Court having charged al-Bashir with war crimes and for his involvement in the Darfur genocide, he is now being investigated for money laundering after suitcases of money were found in his home.

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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