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South African Comedian Tyson Ngubeni Leads Star-Studded Cast in Chicken Licken's New Viral Ad.

South African Comedian Tyson Ngubeni Leads Star-Studded Cast in Chicken Licken's Viral Ad

This viral Chicken Licken ad is trending for all the right reasons.

South African fried chicken franchise Chicken Licken's new ad "Soul Food For A Soul Nation" features the talented comedian Tyson Ngubeni and other young brilliant creatives. The ad makes light of the ongoing national lockdown during the current Covid-19 pandemic and will have you chuckling endlessly.

READ: South African Comedian Tyson Ngubeni's Skits Shine Amid Lockdown

The ad aims to honour those ordinary South Africans who have kept themselves entertained during the lockdown.

The video shows all the events that have taken place during the lockdown including: the girlfriend that was snuck in by her boyfriend in the boot of his car, regulations around exercise during level-four of the lockdown and the viral skits by Kenyan social media sensation Elsa Majimbo.

In the video, phrases like "siyabangena", "Inswempu le makhethe" and President Cyril Ramaphosa's mask mischief during his infamous State of the Nation Address (SONA) allow South Africans to relive the moments that kept them sane and laughing out loud. Additionally, Max Hurrell's hilarious song "When People Zol"—a lighthearted mockery of Minister Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma's ancient lingo around smoking—is perhaps one of the best parts of the ad itself.

Other personnel behind the ad are creative director and photographer Rea Chikane and director of Netflix's Queen Sono, Tebogo Malope, who took to Twitter to thank fans for being able to have the platform to make the nation laugh during these tough times.

Watch the "Soul Food For A Soul Nation" ad below:

Soul Food® For A Soul Nation. www.youtube.com

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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