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South African Comedian Tyson Ngubeni Leads Star-Studded Cast in Chicken Licken's New Viral Ad.

South African Comedian Tyson Ngubeni Leads Star-Studded Cast in Chicken Licken's Viral Ad

This viral Chicken Licken ad is trending for all the right reasons.

South African fried chicken franchise Chicken Licken's new ad "Soul Food For A Soul Nation" features the talented comedian Tyson Ngubeni and other young brilliant creatives. The ad makes light of the ongoing national lockdown during the current Covid-19 pandemic and will have you chuckling endlessly.

READ: South African Comedian Tyson Ngubeni's Skits Shine Amid Lockdown

The ad aims to honour those ordinary South Africans who have kept themselves entertained during the lockdown.

The video shows all the events that have taken place during the lockdown including: the girlfriend that was snuck in by her boyfriend in the boot of his car, regulations around exercise during level-four of the lockdown and the viral skits by Kenyan social media sensation Elsa Majimbo.

In the video, phrases like "siyabangena", "Inswempu le makhethe" and President Cyril Ramaphosa's mask mischief during his infamous State of the Nation Address (SONA) allow South Africans to relive the moments that kept them sane and laughing out loud. Additionally, Max Hurrell's hilarious song "When People Zol"—a lighthearted mockery of Minister Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma's ancient lingo around smoking—is perhaps one of the best parts of the ad itself.

Other personnel behind the ad are creative director and photographer Rea Chikane and director of Netflix's Queen Sono, Tebogo Malope, who took to Twitter to thank fans for being able to have the platform to make the nation laugh during these tough times.

Watch the "Soul Food For A Soul Nation" ad below:

Soul Food® For A Soul Nation. www.youtube.com

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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