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Watch Bernadine Evaristo Talk About Womanhood and Othering on 'BBC: Focus on Africa'

The 2019 Booker Prize winner speaks to BBC about her acclaimed book 'Girl, Woman, Other'.

Earlier this week, British-Nigerian author Bernadine Evaristo was awarded the prestigious Booker Prize for her book, Girl, Woman, Other. Although the Booker Prize forbids that the award be given to more than one individual, the committee reportedly felt that two novels were deserving of this year's prize. While Evaristo made history as the first ever Black woman to win the prize, many were not pleased that she had to share the prize with Canadian author, Margaret Atwood. Recently, in an interview with BBC: Focus on Africa, Evaristo spoke about womanhood, othering in terms of race, sexuality, class and immigration status.


Explaining why she chose to focus on othering in her book, Evaristo says that, "It's about womanhood. It's about the transition from womanhood to adulthood. And it's about the ways in which we are othered as women of color in certain societies, in the UK for example. She goes on to add that, "The women in the book are othered in terms of their sexuality because there are characters on the queer spectrum in the book...they're a diverse group of women. There's no sort of homogeneity among them at all."

While Girl, Woman, Other is Evaristo's eighth book, this is the first time her work has been seriously considered for the prize. The interviewer asks her what she feels needs to be done further in the publishing world to ensure that the stories of Black women writers are recognized and talked about much more. Evaristo responds by saying that the issue is with the publishing industry and who gets to become a publisher in what is a admittedly a White industry.

Towards the end of the interview, Evaristo speaks about the brilliance of the current crop of African authors and the importance of the Caine Prize for African Fiction.

READ: Nigerian Writer Lesley Nneka Arimah is the 2019 Winner of the Prestigious Caine Prize

Watch the full interview below:

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Nnedi Okorafor attends the 70th Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images)

Nnedi Okorafor's 'Binti' Is Being Developed Into a TV Series at Hulu

The award-winning novella is coming to a screen near you.

Binti, the acclaimed book by award-winning Nigerian-American author Nnedi Okorafor, is being adapted into a TV series, set to premiere on Hulu. The Hollywood Reporter was the first to break the news.

The three-part, science fiction novella will be adapted for screen under the studio Media Res. The script is being written by both Okorafor and writer Stacy Osei-Kuffour, who has previously written for Watchmen and The Morning Show amongst others.

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Left: Photo by John Lamparski/WireImage via Getty. Right: Photo by Gregg DeGuire/FilmMagic via Getty.

Uzo Aduba and Zackary Momoh to Star Alongside Lupita Nyong'o In Upcoming 'Americanah' Series

The 10-episode limited series, executive produced by Danai Gurira, will premiere on HBO Max.

News surrounding the upcoming limited series Americanahbased on Chimamanda Adichie's seminal novel of the same name— just got even more exciting. Uzo Aduba as well as British-Nigerian actor Zackary Momoh will star alongside series lead Lupita Nyong'o in the HBO Max series. Tony-winning actress Danai Gurira is the series' showrunner and the pilot writer.

Momoh will play Obinze, the love interest of the protagonist Ifemelu (played by Nyong'o), while Emmy-Winning Aduba will star as Aunty Uju, Ifemelu's "young aunt and confidant," according to Variety. The character is described as "a highly intelligent doctor, Uju left Nigeria under tumultuous circumstances and has resettled in America to build a better life for herself and her son Dike."

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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