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Soap Operas Are Dead—Long Live the Soapie!

5 of our favorite South African soap operas and where to watch them online

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Growing up, my siblings and I knew that once we were done with clearing up the dishes after dinner, at eight o' clock, we'd have to be seated in front of the television in time for our beloved soap opera. Our show—to my mother's annoyance, but oddly to my father's delight—was "Generations." I knew that my schoolmates, friends, other family and literally every black child with a TV at home would be doing the same. We'd go on to discuss that night's episode the next day at school. This became a culture. We grew up with the characters in the show, and from this culture came a loyalty to all kinds of soap operas forever after.

And so trust me when I say that South Africans are going to lose their minds now that Showmax has made several addictive soap opera dramas available this July!

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Politics
CC photo by Darren J Glanville

Why Are We So Obsessed with Making a God of Nelson Mandela?

We're keeping his legacy alive in ways the great man-of-the-people would have abhorred.

July 18th is International Mandela Day here in South Africa and this year it marks what would have been the iconic leader, Nelson Mandela's 100th birthday. Celebrations will abound not just at home, but all over the world. None other than former US president Barack Obama will deliver the keynote address at the Nelson Annual Lecture on the 17th of July. And Beyoncé herself announced she is coming to South Africa to play the Global Citizen Festival in December in honour of Nelson Mandela.

Not to be a wet blanket now, but isn't this all a tad much for one man?

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On Township Car Culture and Why South Africans Love 'The Fast & The Furious' Movies

A South African's guide to perhaps the greatest action movie franchise ever.

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As a child, there was a TV show called Yizo-yizo that I was not allowed to watch because it played just after bedtime. Of course, being forbidden to watch it made it all the more fascinating. The series was set in a 'kasi' or township and looked at the different factors that affected the lives of school children: from gangsterism, violence and peer-pressure to sex, teenage pregnancy and poverty. One aspect of the township culture that really stood out for me and had me secretly watching the series from the shadows of the hallway, was the drag-racing, spinning of cars on dusty roads (the driver hanging out the car through the window) and other phenomenal and over-the-top motoring feats!

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