Photos

Afripedia Exclusives: Angola's Kuduro Scene

'Afripedia,' the new 5-part documentary series from Stocktown Films, shares exclusive behind-the-scenes photos from Angola's Kuduro scene.

All photos are Copyright of Stocktown Films


Photos by Teddy Goitom, Benjamin Taft & Senay Berhe

Afripedia [af-ri-pee-dee-uh] is a new platform and forum for African creatives from Swedish production collective Stocktown. When we first reported on the project back in October, Afripedia had recently launched its first venture, a five-part mini documentary series that aired on Swedish Television (SVT Kunskapskanalen) beginning September 25th. Shot in Kenya, Ghana, Angola, Senegal, Côte d'Ivoire and South Africa, each episode dedicates itself to shedding light on work from a group of creatives within each of those countries. The team is currently producing one more episode in North Africa and has plans to release a full-length documentary in 2016. The first five episodes of Afripedia will be available to watch online in 2015. Until then, the folks at Stocktown have sent us exclusive behind-the-scenes images from each country featured on season one. Every day this week we'll share a new gallery of photos from the set of Afripedia.

First up on our week of Afripedia exclusives is Angola. The episode, which originally aired on September 25th, sees Stocktown head to Luanda in collaboration with Geração 80. It's there that they meet some of the key players on the Kuduro scene, including longtime Okayafrica favorites like transgender kudurista queen Titica, performance artist/multimedia-creator/writer and all-around provocateur Nástio Mosquito, and emcee (plus Batida collaborator) Sacerdote. Watch a trailer for Afripedia's Angola episode below, and see above for behind-the-scenes photos from music videos Stocktown produced for Sacerdote ("Falaste O Que") and Titica ("Olha o Boneco"). Check back tomorrow for exclusive shots from Senegal and Côte d'Ivoire.

>>>Afripedia Exclusives: Angola's Kuduro Scene

>>>Afripedia Exclusives: Senegal & Côte d'Ivoire

>>>Afripedia Exclusives: Ghana

>>>Afripedia Exclusives: Kenya's Afrofuturist Scene

>>>Afripedia Exclusives: South Africa

Follow Afripedia online here and also on Instagram and Facebook.

Spotlight
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

How Beauty Boy, Enioluwa Adeoluwa, Is Shattering the Expectations of Masculinity In Nigeria

Affectionately known as Lipgloss Boy, Enioluwa has become one of the most popular influencers in Nigeria — and he's done so without conforming to the notions of masculinity or imposed limitations on what a man should be able to do.