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Babes Wodumo has Officially Dropped the Assault Charges Against Mampintsha

The troubled couple have reportedly agreed to receive relationship counselling.

South African gqom artist Babes Wodumo, real name Bongekile Simelane, has dropped the assault charges she'd laid against her boyfriend and fellow artist, Mampintsha, real name Mandla Maphumulo, according to News24. This comes after a warrant of arrest was issued by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) after the duo both failed to appear in court.


Since March, South Africans have admittedly experienced a roller coaster of emotions which has left many of them with divided opinions, particularly after Babes made a number of controversial decisions. After Mampintsha released the song "Khona Ingane Lay'ndlini" which referred to the incident of alleged abuse, Babes was later seen performing the song in a video that surfaced on social media and even went on to appear in the music video with both Mampitsha and DJ Tira.

Here's the Latest on South African Artist Babes Wodumo's Assault Case

The NPA has confirmed that the assault charges against Mampintsha have been withdrawn. Spokesperson for the prosecuting body, Natasha Kara, said, "The matter was finalized in that the charge against Maphumulo was withdrawn. This is because both parties adhered to the ADR [mediation] process they committed to."

Babes and Mampintsha have reportedly agreed to receive relationship counselling from the Family and Marriage Society of SA (Famsa), an organization that provides counseling, education and training to South Africans facing challenges in their relationships.

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Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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