News Brief

Former President of Sudan Omar al-Bashir is Currently in Prison

The former head of state is reportedly being kept in solitary confinement and under heavy guard.

After several months of protests by the Sudanese people and a military coup put an end to President Omar al-Bashir's thirty-year rule, the former head of state was reportedly moved to Khartoum's Kobar prison on Tuesday where he is being kept in solitary confinement according to the Guardian.


In what many may rightfully refer to as karma, al-Bashir is currently being detained at the same prison housing hundreds of political prisoners who were arrested during his rule. This comes after Sudanese protesters and opposition groups knows as the Forces of the Declaration of Freedom and Change demanded that the military relinquish power to civilians in a memo they handed over to ruling Transitional Military Council.

Yesterday, al-Bashir's brothers, Abdullah Hassan al-Bashir and Alabas Hassan al-Bashir, were also arrested as the military attempts to capture what they refer to as "symbols and leaders of the previous regime".

READ: Sudan Reacts to the Ousting of Omar al-Bashir and the Announcement of a Military Takeover

However, the military has announced that it will not allow al-Bashir to be extradited for his countless crimes and will instead conduct a trial in Sudan. The former dictator has been on the International Criminal Court's (ICC) wanted list for a decade now on charges of war crimes as well as the genocide that occurred in Darfur—often referred to as the first genocide of the 21st century.

In 2017, the ICC found that South Africa had failed to arrest al-Bashir when he visited the country in 2015 for the African Union Summit. The South African government deliberately ignored a court order that had been issued by the North Gauteng High Court that prevented al-Bashir from leaving the country.


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Photo courtesy of @sahraisha

#BlackOutEid​: Young Black Muslims Shine as They Celebrate Eid

Young Black Muslims have found creative ways to celebrate community and share their best Eid looks, even as they #StayAtHome.

Eid Mubarak to our Muslim fam! Today marks Eid al-Fitr, the official end of the Holy Month of Ramadan.

Despite things being a little different this year (on account of the current pandemic, of course) this hasn't stopped many from finding creative ways to fast, pray and connect with their community during these times. It certainly hasn't stopped young Black Muslims from participating in the virtual tradition known as #BlackOutEid while they continue to #StayAtHome.

#BlackOutEid is an annual celebration which highlights the diversity within the Muslim world. It began in 2015, when Aamina Mohamed created the hashtag to combat the erasure of Black people within the community. Since then, the hashtag has been used across social media with Black Muslims using it to share their sharpest Eid looks.

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