Africa In Your Earbuds

AFRICA IN YOUR EARBUDS #30: L'AFRIQUE SOM SYSTEME

Africa In Your Earbuds #30 features an azonto hype-heavy bonkers-making mix from Netherlands-based trio L'Afrique Som Systeme.


For the 30th installment of Africa In Your Earbuds we tapped Netherlands-based trio L'Afrique Som Systeme, whose member Papa Ghana we've previously featured for his afroelectronic creations. The group delivered an omnidirectional mixtape guided by their eclectic afrobeat, coupé-décalé, kuduro, grime, dancehall and dubstep influences. In their words,

[We're] known for our uptempo African-inspired mixes. Our general idea for the mix was to make people dance if not go bonkers while listening to it. This explains why most of the tracks in this mix are influenced by the so called azonto hype. Over here in Europe it's a big thing, [there are] battles everywhere and random youtube clips of azonto sessions in public areas. We even practice the azonto dance while watching these youtube clips. We also wanted to portray some good upcoming artists like Okmalumkoolkat, we feel South African music isn't much appreciated in most of Africa.

Stream and download AIYE #30: L'Afrique Som Systeme below. Big thanks to Underdog for the cover graphic.

TRACKLIST

LV - Zulu Compurar ft. Okmalumkoolkat - United Kingdom/South Africa

R2Bees - Agyeeei ft. Sarkodie & Nana Boroo (Double Dutch Remix) - Ghana/Nigeria

Dirty Parafin - Papap! Papap! - South Africa

Sarkodie - You Go Kill Me - Ghana

Sarkodie - Dangerous ft. E.L. - Ghana

5Five - Move Back - Ghana

Zakes Bantwini - Wasting My Time (Rocco Dance Floor Mix) - South Africa

5Five - Gargantuan Body - Ghana

Fuse ODG - Azonto ft. Tiffany - United Kingdom

Wonderkid Bounce - Oh My ft. Amartey & Roudeboy Sho - Holland

X-Pensive Nframa - Aundy Adoley (Douster Remix) - Ghana/ France

Papa Ghana - I Am An African (L'Afrique Som Systeme Remix) - Holland

DJ Francky Dicaprio - Sabari Dondo - Ivory Coast

Bab Lee - Sous les Cocotiers - Ivory Coast

Schlachthofbronx - Onwa Nna Na Nwa (Remix) - Germany

Buraka Som Sistema - Tira O Pé - Portugal

Cabo Snoop - Prakatatumba - Cape Verde

DJ Vielo, DJ Anielson and Patcho Debenq - Decale Mon Afrique - Angola

Funana - So Cu Pe - Cape Verde

Janka Nabay - Eh Congo - Sierra Leone

Yellowman - Zungguzungguguzungguzeng - Jamaica

Previously on Africa In Your Earbuds: NOMADIC WAXTHE BROTHER MOVES ONLVBEN ASSITER [JAMES BLAKE'S DRUMMER]JAKOBSNAKECHRISTIAN TIGER SCHOOLSAUL WILLIAMSTUNE-YARDSMATHIEU SCHREYERBLK JKSALEC LOMAMIDJ MOMAAWESOME TAPES FROM AFRICAPETITE NOIROLUGBENGARICH MEDINA, VOICES OF BLACK, LAMIN FOFANA, CHICO MANNDJ UNDERDOGDJ OBAHSABINEBROTHA ONACIDJ AQBTJUST A BANDSTIMULUSQOOL DJ MARVSINKANECHIEF BOIMA

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