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'My Name is Reeva' is the New Documentary About the Late Reeva Steenkamp

The South African documentary series will tell the personal story of the model who was murdered by her boyfriend, Oscar Pistorius.

It's been four years since one of the most infamous court trials rocked South Africa. Oscar Pistorius, South Africa's once beloved Paralympics gold medalist and "Blade Runner", was charged with the murder of South African model, and his girlfriend at the time, Reeva Steenkamp. Initially, Pistorius was sentenced to a measly six years behind bars following a controversial trial and subsequent judgement. However, a little over a year later, his sentence was increased to 13 years and 5 months.

Over the years, there have been much speculation about the relationship between Pistorius and Steenkamp. Question marks still abound in terms of what really transpired on the day Steenkamp died. More recently, her family announced that they are working on My Name is Reeva, a new tell-all documentary they hope will set the record straight on a number of issues, Channel24 reports.


There have been several attempts to document the tragic death of Steenkamp at the hands of Pistorius. The 2017 film Oscar Pistorius: Blade Runner Killer was heavily criticized for its many inaccuracies and described as "cringe-worthy" and "unconvincing". Steenkamp's mother, June Steenkamp, also penned a personal account of her daughter's life entitled Reeva: A Mother's Story, which was published back in 2014.

However, Steenkamp's family hopes that their upcoming documentary will do justice to the story of their daughter's life. The documentary will be produced by Warren Batchelor and Tony Miguel. Currently, the documentary is still in the crowdfunding stage and hopes to raise R40 million (approximately USD 2.6 million).

Speaking about the upcoming documentary, Steenkamp's mother said that, "Through this documentary, we are determined to tell Reeva's story, people will get to see another side that seeks to answer some of the questions that have been left unanswered, the truth, and who Reeva was. She would want us to do this for her."

Watch the trailer for My Name is Reeva here.

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Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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