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This is Why Social Media is Turning #BlueForSudan

"The color represents all of the Sudanese people who have fallen in the uprising," says Shahd Khidir.

Since the ousting of President Omar al-Bashir, Sudan has been embroiled in a tug-of-war between civilians and the Transition Military Council (TMC) who took over power. After civilians rejected the three-year power transfer deal presented by the TMC, ongoing protests have been organised by the Sudanese Professional Association (SPA) especially in the capital city of Khartoum. Just last week, there was a deadly crackdown by the military which left over 100 protesters dead.


One of the protesters who was killed, was a graduate from London's Brunel University, Mohamed Mattar. The young man was reportedly shot while he was attempting to protect two women as security forces violently dispersed the crowd of protesters. Mattar's favorite color was blue.

According to Aljazeera, a friend of Mattar, Shahd Khidir, asked her followers on social media to change their profile pictures to blue as a show of solidarity for the heroic young man. She said, "Once he was murdered, his friends and family changed their profile picture to match his, and eventually other people began to join in...Now [the color] represents all of the Sudanese people who have fallen in the uprising."

There has been widespread criticism on social media of Western media and their failure to adequately cover the current Sudan uprising. Numerous Sudanese civilians have lost their lives and many people have pointed out how this massacre of those who are a part of civic society has not dominated the headlines.

The TMC publicly admitted for the first time, that it ordered the deadly crackdown in Khartoum. Spokesman of the TMC, Shams al-Din Kabashi, said, "We ordered the commanders to come up with a plan to disperse this sit-in. They made a plan and implemented it ... but we regret that some mistakes happened."

Leaders from all over the world are attempting to help find a resolution to Sudan's growing crisis before it spirals into a fully fledged war. We continue to stand with the people of Sudan in their fight for liberation.

Download the #BlueForSudan image below:

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Sou​​th African Actor and Dancer Sibusiso Radebe Has Passed Away

Numerous tributes from South Africans pour in for the multi-talented television and theatre actor as well as dancer.

The new year is off to a tragic start for South Africans, particularly for those in the entertainment industry.

South African television, theatre actor and dancer Sibusisio Radebe has passed away at the age of 37. following a battle with cancer. Family, close friends and his manager Wesley Mark Gainer, today confirmed the news of the young talent having passed away yesterday following a battle with cancer.

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Photo by Xaume Olleros/Getty Images.

Malian Government Claims Anti-Trump Tweets Were a 'Handling Error'

A former Malian government official allegedly used President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita's official Twitter account to describe Trump's recent drone strike on Iraq as a "fuck up".

This past Monday, a number of tweets which referred to President Donald Trump's recent drone strike on Iraq as a "fuck up", were sent from Malian President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita's official Twitter account.

According to News24, the Malian government now claims that the since-deleted tweet was a a result of a "handling error" after a former government official mistook the Twitter account as his own personal one.

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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