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Brandon Mena takes pictures of himself on a mirror with his cellphone, to make content for his OnlyFans profile, in Caracas, on November 12, 2020.

South African Government Announces New Tax Charge for OnlyFans Users

The South African Revenue Services (SARS) has introduced a tax charge for South African OnlyFans users ahead of new financial year.

South Africa has announced that users of popular website, OnlyFans, will be charged standard value added tax (VAT) rates. This comes after OnlyFans, a subscription content service, grew exponentially during 2020 due to the global COVID-19 pandemic. The online platform is known as a free market for content creators who can earn revenue in dollars from monthly subscribers and daily viewers. However, content creators will now have to pay 15 percent of all their earnings to the South African Revenue Services (SARS).


Read: The South African Government May Decriminalize Sex Work

The news seems unbelievable yet SARS spokesperson, Anton Fisher, confirmed that tax had been imposed on the website. According to IOL, Fisher explained that the law was imposed inline with South Africa's VAT Act: "The VAT is imposed under the Act which requires businesses that carry on an enterprise in South Africa to register for VAT and charge the VAT on sales made to its customers."

According to Stuff, OnlyFans users increased as unemployment rates dropped in South Africa during the pandemic. Many South Africans have reported receiving sizeable revenue, some up to a whopping 8000 USD a month. The site allows users such as musicians, artists, fitness trainers to share exclusive curated content for their target audience. However, the website reportedly has mainly adult entertainment of sex videos and nude pictures.

While SARS is set to collect revenue from OnlyFans, sex work itself remains criminal in South Africa. Understandably, South Africans have slammed the imminent tax by pointing to the absence of policies around the regulation of sex work which is currently illegal.

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Interview: How Stogie T’s ‘Freestyle Friday’ Became a TV Show

Freestyle Friday started as lockdown content but is now a fully-fledged TV show on Channel O. In this interview, Stogie T breaks down why the show is revolutionary and talks about venturing into media.

When South Africa was put under a hard lockdown in 2020, Stogie T started Freestyle Friday to "make SA rap again." Freestyle Friday, hosted on Instagram, saw a different cohort of rappers each rap over the same beat picked by the veteran rapper. From niche and emerging rappers to some of the most notable names in South African hip-hop—the likes of AKA, Focalistic, Ginger Trill and several others all participated.

In the last few weeks, however, Freestyle Friday has found its way to cable TV. The show airs every Friday on Channel O, one of the continent's longest-running music TV channels. Freestyle Friday as a TV programme isn't just about freestyles, it's about the art of rapping and the music business, particularly SA hip-hop. Guests range from lyricists to record executives and other personalities aligned with the scene—Ninel Musson and Ms Cosmo for instance.

But Freestyle Friday is only the first media product Stogie T is working on as he is in the process of starting a podcast network, a venture in which he is collaborating with Culture Capital. In the Q&A below, Stogie T breaks down the relationship with Culture Capital, how the show moved from the internet to TV, why it's a revolutionary idea, touches on his venture into media and his future plans.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length.

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