News Brief

Sudan has Appointed a Prime Minister to Govern During the Transitional Period

Abdalla Hamdok says that peace and resolving the economic crisis are his top priorities.

Earlier this month, the leader of the main opposition coalition, Ahmed Rabie, and Gen Mohamed Hamdan Daglo of the Transitional Military Council (TMC), signed a constitutional declaration just shortly after signing their first power-transfer deal. The declaration detailed how a Sovereign Council, consisting of six civilians and five members of the military, would oversee the governing of Sudan during the three-year transitional period to complete civilian rule. Recently, Abdalla Hamdok, was sworn in as the transitional prime minister, according to the BBC. His appointment comes after Lieutenant-General Abdel Fattah Abdelrahman Burhan was appointed the leader of the Sovereign Council, Aljazeera reports.


Hamdok served as a senior economist at the UN for close to a decade and stepped down from his position last year. With very little ties (if at all) to former President Omar al-Bashir, save that he refused al-Bashir's nomination to become Sudan's Finance Minister back in 2018, Hamdok appears to be a somewhat neutral party.

Speaking about his intended course of action in his new role, Hamdok said that, "The government's top priorities are to stop the war, build sustainable peace, address the severe economic crisis and build a balanced foreign policy."

READ: Sudan's Revolution Isn't a Fluke—It's Tradition

Sudan has been through an incredibly tumultuous political time. Following the ousting of al-Bashir back in April after nationwide protests, the military took over to "maintain order" in the country. However, since the military's rule began, many Sudanese civilians have lost their lives. The deadly crackdown of June 3rd saw over 100 protesters staging a sit-in in the capital Khartoum, lose their lives after the military ordered their violent dispersal. A month later, four students were killed by snipers at a mass demonstration in the city of El-Obeid.

It is hoped by many that Hamdok's appointment along with that of the Sovereign Council will usher in a new dawn for Sudan.

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EBRAHIM HAMID/AFP via Getty Images.

Sudan Has Launched an Investigation into Crimes Committed During the Darfur Conflict

The state prosecutor says the investigation will focus on "cases against former regime leaders."

Tagelsir al-Heber, Sudan's state prosecutor, has announced the country's investigation into crimes committed during the Darfur conflict under former President Omar al-Bashir, BBC reports.

The conflict and subsequent crimes committed in the Darfur region from 2003 left around 300,000 people dead and 2.5 million people displaced, France24 adds. Warrants for al-Bashir's arrest were launched by the International Criminal Court (ICC) both in 2009 and 2010 on genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity charges. He has yet to be extradited to face trial for those charges.

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Photo by Ebrahim Hamid/AFP via Getty Images

Sudan Celebrates the Anniversary of the Country's Uprising

It's been one year since the nationwide protests that led to the ousting of then Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir began.

Today marks the one year anniversary since the nationwide protests began in Sudan. The historic uprising led to the ousting of then President Omar al-Bashir and gave way to the current transitional government which consists of members of the military and civil society.

Channel Africa reports that Sudanese civilians have already begun what will be a week of festivities to mark the occasion.

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Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

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