Sudan's Ruling Military and Civilians Have Signed a Power-Sharing Deal

After months of deadly protests, both parties have finally reached an agreement.

TheBBC reports that a power-sharing deal has been signed between the ruling Transition Military Council (TMC) and protest leaders representing the Sudanese people. The deal, which confirms an agreement made earlier this month, will see the military ruling for the first 21 months and power then transferred to civilians for the 18 months leading up to elections.


This power-sharing deal comes just a few days after thousands of protesters took to the streets in "Justice First" rallies and held night vigils in remembrance of over 100 protesters who were killed during the military-led deadly crackdown of June 3rd.

There have been continued talks between the TMC and protest leaders after civilians demanded that the military cede power over to them. However, the military has controversially stood by their stance that their rule is only to ensure that "order is maintained" and that threats to the country's security are minimized.

Back in April, protesters rejected the two-year power-transfer deal and resumed protests which ultimately saw the violent dispersal of protesters in Khartoum by the military.

According to IOL, General Mohammed Hamdan Dagalo of the TMC has referred to the signing of the deal as a "historic" moment and Ethiopian mediator Mohamoud Dirir called it a "great moment for the people of Sudan", some protesters feel aggrieved by the fact that the same military which has killed well over 100 Sudanese civilians, will retain power at the beginning of this deal.

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Photo by TONY KARUMBA/AFP via Getty Images

William Ruto's Presidential Win Clouded by Odinga's Rejection

Former Prime Minister Raila Odinga is struggling to deal with his loss to current Deputy President Ruto, and may influence civil unrest.

East African nation Kenya has long been considered one of Africa's most beautiful examples of a stable, democratically led country. But, as we know, all good things must eventually come to an end.

This year's presidential election proved to be the most tumultuous in the country's recent history, as current Deputy President-turned-President elect William Ruto was announced as the victor earlier this week. His opposition, however, is having a hard time adjusting. After news of his loss came out, Kenyan politician and former Prime Minister Raila Odinga declared the election results "null and void", and decided to challenge them in court.

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Photo Credit: Mazin Elzain

Reem Aljeally is Leading Sudan's Burgeoning Art Scene

Community is at the forefront of Reem Aljeally’s artistic pursuits, as she empowers artists just like her.

Sudan’s art scene is a hidden gem. The country’s capital, Khartoum, has been a budding attraction for creativity and expression, though inextricably linked to the uprisings that shook the country in 2018. Art was deployed as a tool to register discontent on rising prices and the removal of subsidies on basic goods. Artists became an integral part of months-long protests that saw Sudan experiencing numerous marches, strikes, and protests.

Among such artists were Reem Saif-Aldin Aljeally, who created three murals depicted the involvement of women in the sit-ins at the military headquarters in Khartoum.

"My murals, which showed a woman wearing a white toub while carrying people forward, garnered a lot of attention," Aljeally told OkayAfrica. "One mural was erased by the military but two are still there.”

According to Aljeally, the immense expression of creativity was both a result of loosening restrictions on freedom of expression and, at the same time, a catalyst for further change. The 24-year-old artist, who grew up in Khartoum, directs efforts towards helping other emerging artists realize their dreams.

Trained as an architect, Aljeally remembers how she was always fascinated with art. Growing up, she would try to create and put color to almost everything that she owned. While in grade four, Aljeally signed up for extra art classes and she had her first exhibition experience.

“My fascination with design has also been nourished from my childhood. I remember constantly building models and cities of cardboard for games," Aljeally said. "I think that enriched my interest in pursuing architecture, as art was not a practical option for me back then."

Aljeally started taking art more seriously in 2016 after joining a painting competition. She eventually joined her school’s art group and hosted her first solo exhibition in 2017, which was inspired by the Harry Potter movies.

\u200bAljeally with pioneer modernist Kamala Ishaq.

Aljeally with pioneer modernist Kamala Ishaq.

Photo Credit: Abubakr JarElnabi

Besides her abiding presence in the art scene, Aljeally, who is also curator, channels her passion towards addressing social issues. Additionally, she draws her inspiration from personal reflection, observations, and by curiosity. She is also eager to be part of new projects, meet new people and know more about their ideas processes.

“This curiosity led me to be a curator and every day I pick myself up and work," Aljeally said. "There is so much more to be done and to be explored.”

In 2019, her efforts led to the launch of The Muse Multi Studios, an enterprise that works towards building a platform for the local art community. So far, The Muse Multi Studio has been able to train 90 artists on various skills in art including painting, drawing, and illustration. The platform has been able to work closely with almost 40 artists to bring their ideas to life in terms of solo exhibitions or group shows including working with the pioneer modernist Kamala Ishaq to curate a collection of her drawings.

Currently, Aljeally’s studio is hosting its first residency program that includes three researchers, three painters, and three photographers in a project that aims to enrich the critical and visual skills of its residents and assist them in materializing their ideas. The Muse Multi Studio has also worked with children in various programs including the “Stories from the Cubs” that focused on art therapy training for children in a reformatory centre in Khartoum.

Aljeally’s curatorial journey has been both extremely challenging yet satisfying at the same time. Her studio has collaborated and worked with professionals, amateurs, and art lovers in different ways. Some of the partners whom they have worked with include: Rift Digital Lab, the Spanish Embassy, and Education without Borders, providing guidance and assistance to organizations and individuals in regards to artistic projects and with sourcing artists to fulfill a certain role.

“Our focus is to present professionals’ work to the audience through curating it into exhibitions and projects that display the true potential and value of it,” Aljeally said. “While with our art sessions, we focus on youth, children and the community to involve them in the creation process and provide them with a fun environment to create and connect with others. We believe that we only go as far together, hence we try to work with other organizations or individuals in our community."

In July 2020, Aljeally debuted Bait Alnisa, a platform dedicated to all Sudanese women both in the country and diaspora. The platform showcases, supports and empowers Sudanese female artists and promotes their work.

“Bait Alnisa works through exhibitions, online content and articles, training and documentation. Being involved in the art scene, I couldn’t help but notice the lack of presence and representation of female artists and their work,” Aljeally said. “As I believe the female generated art comes in many different unusual forms in our society and it should be represented in more various ways. It has also given me the chance to meet and discover many artists and females leading important careers and visions in our country.”

Reem Saif-Aldin Aljeally headshot

In July 2020, Aljeally debuted Bait Alnisa, a platform dedicated to all Sudanese women both in the country and diaspora.

Photo Credit: Reem Saif-Aldin Aljeally

Haneen Khalid, 22 years-old, born and brought up in Khartoum, Sudan is one of the beneficiaries of Bait Alnisa. According to Haneen, it has been an enlightening journey with Reem who continuously inspires and encourages her.

“She always encouraged my ideas and never boxed me into my creativity,” Haneen said. “My pictures left my small digital space for the first time and it was being showcased for hundreds of people. It was just an immersive experience. I felt very empowered sharing the space with women who came from different backgrounds exhibiting various art. All thanks to Reem’s space that brings us together, empowers us and gives us exposure.”

Throughout her journey, Aljeally dedicated her time to work on her exhibitions. Since debuting in the industry, she has had three solo exhibitions with the fourth coming up in August at the French Institute, Khartoum. However, she has been part of numerous group exhibitions in South Africa, USA, Kenya and Sudan.

Her first artist residency online was in 2020 with the Sudan Moves project with Goethe Institute, Khartoum, where she collaborated with a German art therapist to create a project together titled Non-verbal Dialogue. Aljeally plans to own a gallery in Khartoum that will introduce contemporary art to the community, and to work with artists on uplifting their profession and skills. She would also like to turn The Muse Multi Studios into the first art institution in Sudan, as she continues to build a name for herself locally and internationally.


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Images: Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images; Photo by Joseph Okpako/WireImage; Photo by Burak Cingi/Redferns

This Year's Lost In Riddim Music Festival Is Canceled

The music festival was canceled by organizers as they prepare to come back even bigger and better in the New Year.

Update 08/17: And another one bites the dust.

This year's Lost in Riddim international music and art festival has been canceled, according to a statement shared via the event's official Instagram page. What would have been the Bay Area's delicious groove fest to end off of summer 2022, the raincheck has left both concert-goers and event organizers, Sol Blume, in distress. Performances from the likes of Burna Boy, Wizkid, Major League DJs, Davido, legendary Jamaican rapper Sean Paul, were set to set the stages on fire over this year's Nigerian Independence Day weekend. We trust that they'll come back even stronger after some time to regroup.

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Image courtesy of the Institute Museum of Ghana

Spotlight: Nigerian Artist Festus Alagbe Is Unmasking Your True Identity

We spoke with the visual artist on identity and letting your intuition guide you to success.

In our 'Spotlight' series, we highlight the work of photographers, visual artists, multimedia artists, and more who are producing vibrant, original work.

In our latest piece, we spotlight Nigerian visual artist Festus Kehinde Alagbe. The painting major comes from a family of creatives and entrepreneurs and uses his life experiences and understandings to reflect messages back to the society to which he belongs. Acknowledging his strengths and choosing to focus his energy on his creative pursuits, Alagbe uses the concept of 'masking' to reveal the hidden meaning behind the norms that society has placed upon us. Paul Laurence Dunbar's poem 'We Wear The Mask', acts as a great inspiration for the young artist, as his understanding of human nature led him to portray his artistic subjects as unmasking and masking whichever expression they believe will suit the mood. Alagbe's work also illustrates how the everyday person copes with the harsh realities of life on Earth.

We spoke with the artist about his current spot in Ghana's Noldor Artist Residency, allowing yourself to learn more about your craft, and the pressure that comes with identity.

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

Describe your background as an artist and the journey you've taken to get it to where it is today.

My artistic journey began in childhood: I was born into a family that holds entrepreneurs and creatives in high esteem. And we're all creative -- my parents were fashion designers, and, likewise my twin brother.

I’m an instinctive artist. I have always wanted to express my imaginations and experiences in a visual form -- either on a two-dimensional surface or in three-dimensional form. That which I can not express with words, I want to express as messages that people can learn from, relate with, and encourage society. But, knowing that instincts aren't enough, I joined The Polytechnic, Ibadan's Department of Art and Design as a painting major to be mentored and become a professional Artist. I became a full-time artist when graduated from school.

I’m currently a Visiting Fellow at the Noldor Artist Residency in Accra, Ghana.

What are the central themes in your work?

I capture different bisected facial expressions to represent time and seasons in the form of masks. I believe that the range of expressions that a face creates is not the true identity. Facial expressions are subject to the situation of society. “We wear the mask that grins and lies, it hides our cheeks and shades our eyes,” says a poem titled “We Wear The Mask” by Paul Laurence Dunbar.

The true Identity is hidden inside every individual. The characters you exhibit will be determined by the kind of seeds you sow into yourself -- either love or hatred. I use flowers to capture love, passion, seasons, and transient time. The elements I use in the back are biomorphic and fluid in shape, depicting structures and institutions in the world. I also capture and depict Black bodies bursting through with floral elements, referring to the optimism that lies with the pain of being Black, depicting a sense of growth and resilience in the face of ubiquitous racial prejudice and adversity largely faced by people of color. And the flowers bursting through different genders captures different emotions and expressions.

What is your medium of choice, and why?

I use various mediums to express myself, like acrylic, oil, charcoal, etc. I use different mediums as a professional artist because I don’t want to be limited to a medium before I can express myself.

Recently, I uses oil to detail my subject (faces) and acrylic for the background because it dries faster and can be controlled easily.

How has the pandemic affected you creatively?

It has actually affected me in the area of market value and the unavailability of materials to work. But all glory to God for today.

Can you describe your artistic relationship with ‘Afro-futurism' and 'Surrealism’?

I’m a surreal artist of African origin. So, my artistic practice is based on surrealism from an African perspective to address some situations or issues in society at large. I strike a balance between realism, fantasy, and imagination. Afrofuturism addresses themes and concerns of the African diaspora through technoculture and speculative fiction, encompassing a range of media and artists with a shared interest in envisioning Black futures that stem from Afro-diasporic experiences. While Afrofuturism is most commonly associated with science fiction, it can also encompass other speculative genres such as fantasy, alternate history, and magic realism. These are what make my practice relate to Afro-futurism.

Can you talk about your use of colors and jewelry in your art?

I use dark skin tones and colors to depict Black faces with bodies, and I use monochrome colors to explore abstract landscapes as my background. And the abstraction elements in the back are biomorphic and fluid in shape which is the representation of structures and institutions in the world and society.

Image courtesy of the artist

'Split Intent' 2022


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