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Sudan Commemorates Anniversary of Khartoum Massacre.

Sudan Commemorates One-Year Anniversary of Khartoum Massacre

Today marks a year since over 100 protesters were killed in Khartoum, Sudan, during mass demonstrations which lead to the ousting of former President Omar al-Bashir.

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the deadly Khartoum crackdown which saw at least 118 protesters killed during mass demonstrations in Sudan's capital. After former President Omar al-Bashir stepped down and the military subsequently took over, protesters participated in a sit-in where they demanded that the military transfer power to civilians instead. In an alleged attempt to disperse the protesting crowd, the military used deadly force.


A year has passed since London's Brunel University student, Mohamed Mattar, was killed as he attempted to protect two women amid the dispersion of protesters by armed security forces. A year since social media turned blue in honour of the young man and "all those Sudanese people who have fallen in the uprising," Mattar's friend Shahd Khidir explained.

As many have attempted to make their way to Khartoum to commemorate the massacre, the army has been deployed and has erected barbed wire fences and concrete slabs to block off roads leading to the capital city, BBC reports. It is not yet clear, however, why there are attempts to prevent people from peacefully gathering at the site.

Although the country has gone on to form a transitional government or Sovereign Council comprising of members of both the military and civilians, alongside the appointment of Abdalla Hamdok as the transitional Prime Minister, many of those responsible for the loss of life during protests have not been brought to book.

Women who were raped by security forces on that day have also expressed tremendous dismay at their perpetrators having not been duly charged for their crimes. A trauma center at Khartoum's Ahfad University, which received victims on that day, reportedly documented at least 64 rapes.

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Photo: Aisha Asamany

How Relocating to Ghana Helped Reinvigorate Jewelry Designer Aisha Asamany's Work

Moving to Ghana gave Aisha Asamany's luxury jewelry brand, inspired by Adinkra symbols that traditionally project strength, fearlessness, love and power, renewed verve to tell personal stories of her growing clientele.

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Linked to the 400th year commemoration of the first recorded landing of slaves in the United States, it became a launchpad for the Ghanaian government to convince Black people around the world to permanently settle in the West African country.

Aisha Asamany, a corporate management consultant for high-profile UK financial institutions turned self-taught luxury jewelry designer was one of many who heeded the call, trading in the corporate life for a spiritual and an entrepreneurial journey – one of joy, appreciation, and representation in her fatherland.

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