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Sudan Commemorates Anniversary of Khartoum Massacre.

Sudan Commemorates One-Year Anniversary of Khartoum Massacre

Today marks a year since over 100 protesters were killed in Khartoum, Sudan, during mass demonstrations which lead to the ousting of former President Omar al-Bashir.

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the deadly Khartoum crackdown which saw at least 118 protesters killed during mass demonstrations in Sudan's capital. After former President Omar al-Bashir stepped down and the military subsequently took over, protesters participated in a sit-in where they demanded that the military transfer power to civilians instead. In an alleged attempt to disperse the protesting crowd, the military used deadly force.


A year has passed since London's Brunel University student, Mohamed Mattar, was killed as he attempted to protect two women amid the dispersion of protesters by armed security forces. A year since social media turned blue in honour of the young man and "all those Sudanese people who have fallen in the uprising," Mattar's friend Shahd Khidir explained.

As many have attempted to make their way to Khartoum to commemorate the massacre, the army has been deployed and has erected barbed wire fences and concrete slabs to block off roads leading to the capital city, BBC reports. It is not yet clear, however, why there are attempts to prevent people from peacefully gathering at the site.

Although the country has gone on to form a transitional government or Sovereign Council comprising of members of both the military and civilians, alongside the appointment of Abdalla Hamdok as the transitional Prime Minister, many of those responsible for the loss of life during protests have not been brought to book.

Women who were raped by security forces on that day have also expressed tremendous dismay at their perpetrators having not been duly charged for their crimes. A trauma center at Khartoum's Ahfad University, which received victims on that day, reportedly documented at least 64 rapes.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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