Interview
Image courtesy of Kojey Radical.

Interview: Kojey Radical On the Importance of His Dual British-Ghanaian Identity

The British-Ghanaian artist talks about growing up in East London, getting in touch with his Ghanaian heritage and his new project, Cashmere Tears.

In this age of technology, "creative" is a blanket term facilitating the spread of multiple talents, which is readily seen in copious social media bios. The phrase "Jack of all trades, master of none," springs to mind in that respect, yet now and again an artist follows the path of the polymath and blooms.

Kojey Radical is one who belies his young years as a studious figure who incorporates a myriad of experimentation via spoken word, fashion, design and music, just (to name a few.

Born Kwadwo Adu Genfi Amponsah in London, of Ghanaian descent, Kojey has navigated the underground with a number of insightful and acclaimed projects tracing his own identity as he builds visual narratives themes on depression, love and God.

Following the recent release of Cashmere Tears, we speak to the accomplished artist on growing up in London, the experience of dual heritage, and headlining his first festival this year.

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Julie Adenuga: "There Are Young Artists In Nigeria Who Are Changing the World"

In an exclusive interview, the Beats 1 radio presenter opens up about her Nigerian heritage, documenting Homecoming in Lagos, and London being an important hub for afro-fusion sounds.

Julie Adenuga sits at the intersection of two continents.

As an affable tastemaker who transforms banal interviews into engaging conversations with some of the most famous artists in the world, Julie is leading the global dialogue on new music from her daily radio show, which broadcasts to over 100 countries.

The North London native of Nigerian descent hails from a musical family, her brothers are artists Skepta and JME, and has risen from the underground as a self-taught presenter on former pirate radio station Rinse FM to being one of three lead DJ's with her Beats 1 show on Apple Music.

A champion of homegrown talent in the UK and across the African diaspora, Julie is a purveyor of the afro-fusion genre, as is evident in her recent Homecoming documentary, which captured the fresh innovators from the Lagos music scene, and her DON't @ ME club nights, which has featured Ghetts, Lady Leshurr and The Compozers as residents.

Chosen as one of OkayAfrica's 100 Women celebrating extraordinary women from Africa and the diaspora, we speak with the presenter and broadcaster on owning her Nigerian identity, the responsibility of spreading afrobeats and why London is a key location for the genre.

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