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Watch TOBi Perform 'Beige' on A COLORS SHOW

The Nigerian-Canadian artist performs his new laid-back single at the Colors Studios.

Nigerian-Canadian artist TOBi, born Oluwatobi Ajibolade, is a young and talented rap/soul musician on the rise. In May of this year, he released his debut album entitled STILL, a 13-track project which is an exploration of both joy and pain within male vulnerability. The debut album followed his 7-track mixtape FYi, which he released three years prior. Most recently, the artist released a single entitled "Beige" which he performed on A COLORS SHOW.


Listen to STILL on Apple Music or Spotify.

Describing his debut album in a social media post a few moths ago, TOBi said that:

"This album was years in the making with several iterations throughout. STILL being true to my life story, it was best for it to be split into 3 chapters of learning and unlearning; Searching, Conflict, and Salvation. With it finally completed and seeing the light of day, I have so many people to thank on this. It feels pretty surreal thinking about the collection of humans that have contributed to this beautiful body of work."

Just yesterday, the artist released "Beige", a track where he shows off his soulful vocals on a classic hip hop beat. Clad in a bright outfit complete with African wax-print trousers, his performance is laid-back but confident—definitely essential viewing.

Watch TOBi's performance on A COLORS SHOW below:

TOBi - Beige | A COLORS SHOW www.youtube.com

Film

Raoul Peck’s, 'I Am Not Your Negro,' Is a Must-Watch In the Wake of George Floyd’s Murder

Revisiting James Baldwin's writing from decades past, this documentary shows just how little the Black experience in the US has changed.

Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck's masterpiece, I Am Not Your Negro, was released in 2016, but is based on James Baldwin's last unpublished book, Remember This House. I am not Your Negro captures Baldwin's reflections on the assassinations of his three close friends, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X and Medgar Evers, in the height of the civil rights movement. It also draws on Baldwin's lived experiences as a Black man in America who lived from 1924-1987 and his active writing career that spanned over four decades.

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